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I’ve accidentally eaten gluten … what can I do??

Posted By Alison On Oct 26, 2011 @ In Celiac Disease,Gluten Intolerance,Symptoms | 15 Comments

It happens. You accidentally eat gluten, and you become sick. Is there anything you can do?

The following is an email I received from a concerned mother, whose daughter suffered recently from an accidental gluten ingestion:

My daughter has just made a transatlantic flight during which the attendants gave her a meal designated specifically for her as gluten free (she had called ahead). She was vomiting for hours on the flight and on route home from the airport.

In the past she has experienced strong “brain fog”, depression, anxiety, fatigue, multiple canker sores, etc when she has gotten a little bit of gluten (she is a college student and her roommates and their guests have occasionally used her stuff or spilled beer, etc).

We know the appropriate treatment for celiac is a gluten free diet, but what can a person do to treat accidental gluten contamination? Are there foods, medications, or therapies that can help eliminate the toxin from the system and shorten the reaction time?

To answer this question I turned to Sheila Wagner, certified nutritionist specializing in food intolerance. She is also gluten-free and has suffered herself from the ill effects of gluten-by-accident. Here is what Sheila recommends for gluten exposure:

Despite being extra careful about eating gluten free, unfortunately, it’s always possible to encounter gluten in settings where we don’t prepare our own food, such as airplanes, restaurants or parties for example. Particularly for these times, I recommend having DPP-IV enzymes available to assist with lessening the gluten response. DPP stands for dipeptidyl peptidase and it is one of many enzymes that we make in our small intestine. Among its many functions is its ability to digest gluten and casein. Lab studies have shown a decrease in blood levels of gluten antibodies following ingestion of manufactured DPP-IV enzymes.

Compounds like metals, pesticides and certain antibiotics can interfere with DPP-IV function and may account for the differences in functional integrity of this enzyme from person to person. So as much I recommend gluten intolerant individuals carry these enzymes with them just in case they are needed, not everyone will get the same degree of benefit by taking them. There is no one protocol for taking the enzymes but I often suggest taking 1-2 capsules as soon as possible after ingesting gluten (or dairy) and then again later in the evening on an empty stomach in order to mop up any gluten that remains in the system. Some people continue to take 1-2 capsules on an empty stomach the next day and even two days following gluten ingestion to continue their attempts at diminishing the slow acting gluten antibody responses.

You can find DPP-IV enzyme containing products on health food store shelves.  Make sure to read the ingredient labels carefully that the product in fact contains DPP-IV. Both Kirkman Labs and Klaire Labs make products specifically for gluten and casein digestion that contain DPP-IV.

Does anyone else have strategies or product suggestions to help relieve accidental gluten ingestion.


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