13 Gluten-Free/Allergen-Free Holiday Tips

Posted on November 16th, 2013 by Alison | Posted in Holidays/Special Events | ADD A COMMENT »

If you are gluten-free or have any other allergy or dietary restriction, it is important to have strategies for navigating the holidays so that you can attend the celebrations stress-free and, hopefully, enjoy them too!

Here are some practical tips for coping with holiday events:

1. TELL THE HOST

There’s nothing worse than going to a dinner and having the host prepare an entire meal that you cannot eat. Make the host aware of your dietary restrictions and you might be pleasantly surprised by the effort that he or she goes through to accommodate you. Gluten-free diets and food allergies are becoming more common and people are more knowledgeable about special diets, so give your host a chance!

2. OFFER TO BRING A DISH

The easiest and most sure-fire way to make sure there is something you can eat at a party is to bring a dish. Whether you purchase something safe or make it yourself, you will be guaranteed not to starve. If it’s desserts you miss most, then bring treats. If bread is what you need, then bring dinner rolls or cornbread. There are many available gluten-free prepared foods and baking mixes that will help to fulfill your cravings.

3. HELP PLAN THE MEAL

Who doesn’t need help with the holiday meal? If the host is a family member or close friend, offer to help plan the menu and even assign dishes to guests if appropriate. That way, you can have some control over what dishes are going to be prepared, or at least you will know ahead of time what the meal will entail.

4. DO THE GROCERY SHOPPING

If you have been living gluten-free or with food allergies for a while, you know your safe foods, which means grocery shopping for your foods is easier for you than for anyone else. So if you are visiting relatives or friends and plan to make a dish while you are there, make time to go to the store. It will take the pressure off of your host and give you assurance that your ingredients are safe.

5. OFFER SUGGESTIONS

What not to do: call your host and say “Oh, by the way, I’m gluten-free. Thanks!” click. Don’t expect your host to know what gluten-free means or how to avoid another ingredient that you are sensitive to. What you can do is offer suggestions for foods that you know are safe. For example, if the host is serving ham, you can let them know some of the brands that are gluten-free: Costco spiral ham, Niman Ranch, Honeybaked Ham (they recently changed their honey glaze recipe to be gluten-free). You could suggest a ready-made gluten-free bread to use for their traditional stuffing recipe and some safe brands of broth (Pacific, Imagine, Kitchen Basics are some).

6. GET IN THE KITCHEN

Holidays hosts will often accept help in kitchen, especially if they get overwhelmed when it gets closer to mealtime and they haven’t finished preparing everything. While you are in the kitchen, you can check ingredients in flavoring packets or canned soups – stuff that goes into those “old favorite” recipes.  Maybe you can even intervene in the gravy-making and use cornstarch or arrowroot starch instead of wheat flour to thicken. If you are not a chef, at least you can get an idea of what you can and cannot eat.

7. ASK QUESTIONS

You’re not going to be able to guess what’s in a dish just by looking at it, so you will need to ask questions about ingredients and how the food was prepared. When in doubt, leave it out.

8. READ LABELS

Have you ever looked through other people’s garbage or recycling bins? Sometimes you just have to know… what brand of chicken broth did they use? Are these crackers gluten-free? What ingredients are in the seasoning packet used in the dip?

9. EAT BEFORE YOU GO

You never want to show up to an event starving if you aren’t sure what’s going to be served. Have some food in you before you arrive. An empty stomach can lead to heightened emotions and if you are drinking alcohol, can lead to something worse. Put a buffer in your belly just in case.

10. BRING EMERGENCY FOOD

It’s always a good idea to stash a snack — in your purse, in your car, even a pocket of a jacket. Rice crackers, nuts or a bar are easy to transport and nibble on in a food emergency.

11. BRING YOUR OWN MEAL

If you have so many food restrictions that it would nearly impossible for your host to know what to feed you, take the pressure off and just establish that you will be bringing your own food. You will be safe and won’t starve and your host, though she may feel bad, will most likely be relieved.

12. BE PATIENT

You might fully understand your diet and the reasons you are doing it, but others might not get it. Don’t expect your friends and relatives to understand your special diet right away, especially if you rarely see them. There is a learning curve when it comes to eliminating gluten, or dairy, or anything else. You may feel frustrated, but they may be just as frustrated as you.

13. DON’T PREACH

Let’s face it — we all have family members we think are in denial and need to eliminate gluten and/or something from their diet. But while they are eating Aunt Susie’s famous pumpkin pie at the Thanksgiving table is not the time to get on your soapbox and let them know how eating gluten-free will change their lives! Talking about reflux, migraines and bloating are probably not be what people were looking forward to when they arrived at the holiday gathering. So hold off on your sermon — maybe after the holidays when they are feeling ill (from all that holiday food) would be a good time to broach the subject.

Do you have tips to share? Feel free to provide them in the comments section!
Need a Pep Talk?


A Gluten-Free Pep Talk For the Holidays

Posted on November 12th, 2013 by Alison | Posted in Emotions, Holidays/Special Events | ADD A COMMENT »

Holidays can be a stressful time even without special dietary restrictions – people are dealing with family, travel, expenses, and cooking for guests. Add in a gluten-free diet, or a gluten-free-plus diet and it can make for some challenging moments. When you are the host of a holiday meal or event, you are in control of your menu, but if you are the guest with a restricted diet, a holiday event can stir up a myriad of emotions. I was diagnosed 11 years ago right between Thanksgiving and Christmas, and I remember what it was like to be surrounded by food but feel like there was nothing safe to eat.

Whether you are new to the gluten-free diet or have been doing it for years, you may experience any of the following emotions as a guest at a holiday event:

  • Anxiety
    • Will there be something I can eat? Will there be anything I can eat?
    • This anxiety causes many people to just stay home!
  • Fear
    • Will I get sick… (again)?
    • Fears about cross-contamination can get in the way of any enjoyment of a meal.
  • Embarrassment
    • Will my friends and family think I’m a pain? What if they made me something special and I have to ask about the ingredients or cross-contamination? Will they apologize again and again that they are eating something that I can’t eat?
    • Sometimes you just want to disappear!
  • Sadness or Anger or Resentment
    • Why can’t I enjoy the freedom that everyone else can? How can I enjoy this meal if I can’t have Aunt Susie’s famous pumpkin pie?
  • Hunger!
    • This may just be a psychological hunger, as there may be enough food to eat, but it feels like there is so much that you can’t have.
  • Kids emotions may be intensified:
    • Quote from my daughter: “It’s hard because you walk into someone’s house and there’s all this good stuff all around that you can’t have and you can only have the other stuff like turkey and vegetables.”

I want to tell you a little story about one of my emotional moments…

I was out at a dinner recently in Las Vegas for a work event. I was with a table of about 14 people I didn’t really know at a restaurant that I was told was a Thai restaurant called Jasmine in the Bellagio, so I felt confident that there would be something I could eat. After we got the menus I realized that it was in fact a Cantonese restaurant and when I asked the waiter what I could have on the menu, I was told that there was only one dish that I could have. While everyone else was ordering appetizers, and plates to share, I felt so uncomfortable and was overcome with this feeling that I was going to cry.

I was then mortified that I, a grown woman, would cry in front of all of these people, and what would they think of that?? So I had to have a self-coaching moment – you know, when you’re like:

“C’mon – pull yourself together! You can do it. It’s just one meal. You’re going to get through this. Do not cry. Do not cry!”

I had to look down, pretend I was doing something on my phone for a minute, and gather myself. It turned out that the one dish on the menu that I could have was delicious and… imagine… I had a fun time enjoying the non-food part — the company of the people at the table and the view of the dancing fountains of the Bellagio out the window.

So if you find yourself in one of those tough moments this holiday season (or ever after), try to find your Inner Coach to help you get through.

Maybe you need this kind of coach:

Or someone a little more smiley :):

Or maybe you really need this guy!

Whichever one works for you, use that Inner Coach to guide you when you have feelings of despair. Instead of focusing on what you can’t have, find what you can eat, and get enjoyment from things other than the food. Rather than stand around the appetizer table, have a conversation with an elderly family member. If you can’t nibble from the dessert tray, play with the kids or hold a baby or look through photo albums… and don’t forget to appreciate the dancing fountains outside the window!

Happy Holidays! :)
See also: 13 Gluten-Free/Allergen-Free Tips for the Holidays


How to Make Gluten-Free Brownie Bites

Posted on January 26th, 2013 by Alison | Posted in Egg Allergy, Food Ideas, Holidays/Special Events, Recipes & Cooking Tips | Read 8 Comments - Add Your Own »

When I thought of how to make gluten-free brownie bites one day, I couldn’t believe I hadn’t thought of it earlier. So simple, and so useful! These are also egg-free, dairy-free and nut-free.

There’s really no recipe here, but instead, an idea. All you need is a mini-muffin pan (I use this one) and a gluten-free brownie mix that you like. Because my daughter also has egg allergies, I need to make them egg-free. The mix I have been using for years is Pamela’s Brownie Mix, which has a “Fudgiest Brownie” recipe the bag – the only thing you add is oil and water. Sometimes cooking without eggs or with egg replacer can result in a batter that seems undercooked or takes a lot longer to cook, but because these are made in a mini-muffin tin, they get baked through very nicely.

Tip for Allergy Moms: These brownie bites can also be used as mini-cupcakes – just add frosting and sprinkles. These freeze well, so make extra and store them for a later date. Easy last-minute treat!

Tip for Valentine’s Day:  Use a heart-shaped mini muffin pan to make heart brownie bites for Valentine’s Day. Make sure to smooth the batter in each one as much as possible, and don’t fill to the top so that it bakes flatter. Top cooled brownies with pink frosting and colorful sprinkles! (I just ordered this Wilton Silicone heart mini-muffin pan.)

Which brownie mix to use?
There are many, many (many!) gluten-free brownie mixes on the market, so take your pick (most of these are linked to Amazon in case you can’t find them where you live). After compiling this list, I was shocked at how many there are! I have not taste-tested these, so you will have to make decisions based on your own taste, ingredient preference, price and availability.

Which mix is your favorite? Your 2 cents is welcome here!


Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin Holiday Potluck 2012

Posted on November 8th, 2012 by Alison | Posted in GIG of Marin, Holidays/Special Events | Read 1 Comment - Add Your Own »

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Mark your calendars and get out your recipe books: our Holiday Potluck is slated for Tuesday, Dec. 4. With a start time of 6:30 pm, this annual tradition offers more time for socializing among members and enjoying delicious gluten free foods together.

We are delighted to announce that this year our special guest will be Elaine Taylor, president of the Taylor Family Foundation and founder of Camp Celiac. In the spirit of the season, GIG of Marin will be giving the donations we collect at the door to The Taylor Family Foundation to support their goal of preserving the wellness and enhancing the quality of life for Northern California children with life-threatening or chronic illness, including celiac disease.

We will also hold a special raffle to raise money for the Taylor Foundation so bring extra cash or your check book!

Elaine Taylor has celiac disease herself, and is an advocate for education about gluten.  Her daughter, Katie Alin, is the owner of Miglet’s Gluten Free Bakery in Danville.  Read an interview with Elaine here.

Elaine Taylor and daughter Katie Alin at Miglet’s.
For the potluck, please bring a savory or sweet item to share with a card identifying the ingredients in your dish–particularly ingredients that are known to cause reactions in some people like eggs, dairy, corn, etc–so that all can find foods that are safe for them to enjoy.
And, if you can, please stick around at the end to help clean up the room–many hands make light work.
Because we need to provide enough supplies for everyone to enjoy the potluck, RSVPs are particularly important for this meeting. Please do so on our Facebook event page or by sending an email.
Help us spread the word and reach more people seeking support for their gluten free lives: visit our website for a printable flyer that you can post in public places and share with your friends, family and medical practitioners.Whether you have celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, or are learning more about gluten free living for yourself, family or friends, we welcome you to the GIG of Marin. New members, friends, and loved ones are always welcome.The Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin will meet:

  • Tuesday, December 4th
  • 6:30 to 9:00pm
  • Community Room at Corte Madera Town Center (upstairs at PF Chang’s end) 770 Tamalpais Dr. Suite 201, Corte Madera, CA, 94925

We look forward to seeing you!


Valentine’s Cookies (gluten-free, allergen-free)

Posted on February 8th, 2012 by Alison | Posted in Holidays/Special Events, Recipes & Cooking Tips | Read 2 Comments - Add Your Own »

Gluten-free Valentine's Cookies

These are the gluten-free allergen-free Valentine’s cookies that my girls and I made last year. This picture makes me happy because of the beautiful imperfection created by their little hands!

After years of experimenting with different people’s recipes, I finally have had success. For roll out sugar cookies that maintain their shape and taste good, I recommend two recipes. One is Adventures of a Gluten-Free Mom’s Cut-Out Sugar Cookies. I followed the recipe for the cookies exactly, except for almond extract due to nut allergies in my house, and I just use regular powdered sugar to make the icing, but if you need to be corn-free, she has a great recipe for powdered sugar without the cornstarch. The other recipe I recommend is Cybele Pascal’s Allergy Free Rolled Sugar Cookies. Note that she uses rice milk for the icing, but I personally don’t like the taste of rice milk and think it makes frosting taste “off.” You can use water, milk or coconut milk instead if you are like me and prefer something other than rice milk.

Remember when decorating cookies that you want to put the sprinkles on right away because the icing will set and then the sprinkles won’t stick. Also remember that you really can’t go wrong if you put out little bowls of sprinkles and let your kids exercise their creativity (I do recommend frosting them yourself however!) If you use sprinkles that complement each other, the cookies will look great no matter what and they will be so proud to serve them to their family, friends, and classmates.


Celebrating nine years gluten-free and happy holidays to you!

Posted on December 20th, 2011 by Alison | Posted in Holidays/Special Events, Sure Foods Living News | Read 3 Comments - Add Your Own »

On December 28, 2002 I received a diagnosis of celiac disease and began eating gluten-free. I could never have imagined how that diagnosis would change my health or the course of my life. I knew soon after that I needed to share this information, and I turned to the web.

This blog has been been visited by over a half a million different people over the years — that’s amazing to me! I have been able to help people find a diagnosis when their doctors failed them. I have been able to guide people in how to live gluten-free. Because my own daughter was diagnosed with severe food allergies, I have commiserated and shared advice with other allergy moms. I have gotten strength and support from my readers through their comments, emails and phone calls. I so appreciate your thoughts.

Thank you to everyone who continues to support me in my quest to educate and provide support. I don’t look at my diagnosis as a curse. Instead, I am thankful to have discovered a healthy way to live. Happy Holidays to you all!


This Week Only: Donate $2 (Or More) To Help Send Children To A Gluten-Free Summer Camp!

Posted on December 19th, 2011 by Alison | Posted in Holidays/Special Events | ADD A COMMENT »

If you or your child has ever been to summer camp, you have memories of the playing in the outdoors and making new friends. But what if your child couldn’t go because of his special dietary needs? Fortunately, special camps are popping up around the U.S. and this summer the Celiac Disease Foundation is starting a new one in southern California.

In the spirit of the giving season, I am hoping that you will help provide scholarships for children to attend this gluten-free summer camp. This week, giving just $2 will go a long way…

Through Sunday, December 25, Gluten-Free Saver has partnered with Van’s Natural Foods to raise money to send children to next summer’s CDF-sponsored summer camp, and Van’s is matching all donations up to $1,000!

The goal is to raise $2,000 – and when you donate $2, you’re really contributing $4.

You can read more about the fundraiser here: www.glutenfreesaver.com.

The summer camp will be held in San Bernardino in Southern California from July 30 to August 3, 2012, and it’s open to all 7-15 year old gluten intolerant and gluten-sensitive children – not just those diagnosed with celiac disease.

I hope you will join me in giving $2 (or more if you wish) so children can attend a camp where they don’t have to worry about the food, and they can just enjoy being kids. Please help reach the goal of $2,000. Every $2 helps. 100% of all donations will go directly to the Celiac Disease Foundation.

YES! I want to help send a child to a gluten-free summer camp and donate $2 right now!

Thank you!


Finding or making your favorite holiday foods – gluten-free, allergen-free

Posted on December 13th, 2011 by Alison | Posted in Dairy Allergy, Egg Allergy, Holidays/Special Events, Peanuts/Nuts Allergy, Recipes & Cooking Tips | Read 4 Comments - Add Your Own »

For people who are gluten-free or have food allergies, the holidays can be a reminder of what we can’t eat. Gluten and other allergens are everywhere, and because we are more social at this time of year, this fact becomes more obvious as we attend holiday parties, share meals with family and friends, and are tempted by sweet treats all around.

But you don’t have to go without your favorite foods! You may not be able to indulge in everything, but think about what food would make you feel the most emotionally satisfied — is it pie, is it stuffing? Is it a box of chocolates, matzoh ball soup? Which one holiday food would give you the greatest pleasure? Then, make it happen! If you can buy it, treat yourself! If you have to make it yourself, do it. If someone else wants to make it for you, great! If you don’t have to stop at one food, by all means, don’t! If you are feeling overwhelmed by all the things you can’t eat, let’s simplify it.

I hope this short list of suggestions can help, and if there’s something else you’re longing for, let me know, and I will use my resources to try to find you the enjoyment you deserve!

GLUTEN-FREE / ALLERGEN-FREE GINGERBREAD MEN OR HOUSE

Buy it: Oops, we’re past the deadline already for ordering an allergen-free gingerbread house kit from A&J Bakery, but now you know for next year. Sensitive Sweets in southern California is also making an allergen-free gingerbread kit for purchase.

Make it: You can make this. Seriously, you can. Read my post “I made an allergen-free gingerbread house!

ROLL OUT SUGAR COOKIES

Buy it: I haven’t found any gluten-free shaped sugar cookies you can buy in stores that are gluten-free, and many of the sugar cookie mixes don’t make cookies that hold their shape.

Make it: I am very excited this year that I found a GREAT recipe for roll-out sugar cookies that are free of gluten, dairy, eggs and nuts! The recipe is from Heidi at Adventures of a GF Mom. (The recipe calls for almond extract which I replace with vanilla.) Cybel Pascal has a recipe for sugar cookies that is also free of the top allergens.

PIE OR PIE CRUST

Buy it: Whole Foods’ Gluten-Free Bakehouse brand has a pie crust, and you can find finished pies or tarts from Katz Gluten Free, Crave Bakery, and Christine’s Upper Crust Pies.

Make it: There are actually tons of gluten-free pie and pie crust recipes out there if you want to make it from scratch. Some of the sites that have recipes are Whole Foods, Simply Gluten-Free, Living Without Magazine, Elana’s Pantry, and Gluten-Free Girl. You can also use commercially available flour blends to make a crust, which saves you some steps. King Arthur shows you how, and if you want a really easy with video instruction, Pamela of Pamela’s Products shows you how to make a gluten-free pie using her mix (is also egg-free and can be dairy-free). Jules of Jules Gluten Free also shows you how to make pie using her flour blend.

GRAVY

Buy it: You can purchase gluten-free gravy mixes. Here is a list of search results for gluten-free gravy on Amazon. Mayacamas is another company that makes gluten-free gravy mixes.

Make it: Instead of flour, use a gluten-free starch. Here’s a little primer on wheat-free thickeners from FitSugar. Ali at Nourishing Meals explains how to make gluten-free gravy. A chef from Whole Foods shows in a video two ways to make gravy, and The Family Chef shares her easy steps.

STUFFING

Buy it: Look around — gluten-free bread  crumbs or croutons are available, but if you can’t find them, you can buy gluten-free bread like Udi’s or Rudi’s to use in any traditional stuffing recipe.

Make it: You can make a loaf of gluten-free bread to use in stuffing recipes. That’s what I do because I can make the bread dairy and egg-free also for people with multiple food allergies in my family. This recipe for Harvest Stuffing always turns out. If you don’t want to use bread, opt for a rice dressing, which will be naturally gluten-free. Make sure any broth you are using is gluten-free. If you have nut allergies, watch out — many stuffing recipes call for nuts.

MATZOH BALL SOUP

Buy it/Make it: You buy the mix to make your own matzoh balls. They are really good and I love the name: Mock-Zah Ball Mix.

POTATO LATKES

Buy it: Hmmm… nope, you’re going to have to make these.

Make it: Easy to make gluten-free, just substitute an all-purpose gluten-free flour blend for the flour called for in traditional recipes. Need to be egg-free too? Don’t worry, I figured this one out for you: Gluten-Free Egg-Free Latke Recipe

CHOCOLATES

Buy it: See’s Candies is still my favorite boxed-chocolates. They have an allergen list, so depending on your allergy, you might be able to find something you can have!

Make it: You can easily make chocolate lollies and shapes by following these steps:

  1. Buy candy molds in holiday shapes, like snowflakes or snowmen or Christmas shapes or Santas.
  2. Buy Enjoy Life Foods Chocolate Chips or Mega Chunks – they are free of the top 8 allergens.
  3. Temper the chocolate in the microwave by heating the chocolate in a bowl in the microwave, at power level 5 or 50% for 30 seconds. Using a rubber spatula in a gentle sweeping motion,  stir the chocolate, even if none of it has become liquid yet and return the bowl to the microwave oven for another 30 seconds. Remove, stir, and repeat until about two-thirds of the chunks become liquid and about one-third are in soft lumps. Continually stir to cool the chocolate until the soft lumps disappear and the chocolate has cooled a little.
  4. Pour the chocolate into the molds, or use a spoon or spatula to put it in, and let it set in the refrigerator.
  5. When chilled completely, wrap the chocolates with colored foil or clear wrap.

What else is tugging at your tummy this holiday season?


How to navigate Halloween with food allergies

Posted on October 13th, 2011 by Alison | Posted in Holidays/Special Events | Read 3 Comments - Add Your Own »

My little beeHalloween is an exciting time for kids, but can also be a tough one for kids with food allergies and sensitivities, and a very stressful time for their parents. So, how does a gluten-free mom of a daughter with severe food allergies handle Halloween? Let me share some of my strategies for coping with this scary season!

First, let me say that I’m not an advocate of candy. In fact, I think it’s terrible for our health and I wish these candy companies didn’t exist to manufacture crap that is contributing to the obesity and illness in our society. Plus, my kids turn into crazy wild animals at the sight of candy and nothing else but that morsel of sugar seems to matter to them.

So, now that I got that out (whew!), I will say that I am also realistic and want my kids to have the same fun as all the other kids. We go to Halloween parties, we decorate our house and get dressed up, and my kids get to trick-or-treat for candy. We just need to do it a little differently and carefully.

Know what is safe ahead of time

No matter what the Halloween activities, you will find them much more enjoyable if you know what candies and foods are safe for your child ahead of time instead of in the middle of the craziness. Use my Halloween Safe Candy Lists to guide you!

Also, listen to the radio show I did as a guest of Jules Dowler Shepard. We talk about the candy lists, food labeling and what those allergen statements really mean.

Listen to internet radio with Jules Gluten Free on Blog Talk Radio

School Parties

I always sign up to bring a treat to the class party. Always. Do I always want to? No, I don’t. But, I know how important it is to my kids to get to have a treat at the party. Don’t have time? It doesn’t Pumpkin face cookieshave to be fancy! Don’t put pressure on yourself to be Martha Stewart. Your kids will be happy with whatever you come up with. If you can’t think of anything, there’s always rice crispy treats (make in the shape of a ghost if you want to go crazy!) Last year I made chocolate chip cookies and then decorated them like pumpkins. My point is, I didn’t have time to roll out and cut sugar cookies, so I went with chocolate chip instead. The kids loved them!

I always assume that there will be candy at school, so I am being proactive this year and will give my Allergen-Free Candy Quick List out to my kids’ teachers and other central school resources. For example, my school has a Facebook page now, so I posted the link to the list on there. Usually teachers and parents are grateful to know what to buy so that every kid can partake.

Trick or Treating

Trick or Treat!You might be able to control the candy that your child receives at school, but when trick-or-treating your child is going to have every kind of candy being dropped in their bag. What to do? The first couple years it was difficult to explain to my child that she couldn’t eat certain candies until I checked them at home. She was also young enough that I could steal the unsafe candies out of her bag without her knowing. There’s no way I could do that now! But, she’s also old enough that she understands we need to check the questionable pieces of candy and that if she can’t have it, she gets to choose a different candy from my stash of safe candy (usually it’s the same candy we are giving out at the door). The trade policy works really well for us, because she feels it is fair, rather than just having to throw away candies she can’t have.

I think most parents agree that they don’t really want their kids eating all the candy they get, so some clever parents have devised creative ways of getting their kids to give up the candy. One idea I have heard is the Candy Witch or the Switch Witch. The kid leaves the candy on Halloween night (or subsequent nights) and the Witch leaves a present or money in exchange. My kids think gift cards are the coolest thing ever, so maybe the Witch will leave one of those!

We also have a local dentist who pays kids for candy and then sends the candy to our troops overseas. Pretty nice idea.

Have fun!

Don’t forget to remind yourself and your kids that Halloween is not just about taking candy from strangers. It’s also about gory cut-off body parts, creepy spiders and weirdos walking around town with masks on. hee hee hee!


Allergen-Free Halloween Candy Quick List 2011

Posted on October 4th, 2011 by Alison | Posted in Candy, Holidays/Special Events, Products | Read 14 Comments - Add Your Own »

THIS INFORMATION MAY BE OUTDATED. PLEASE SEE THE NEW 2013 LIST.

This is a quick list of allergen-free Halloween candy for 2011. This list includes candies that do not contain gluten or the top 8 allergens (wheat, milk, soy, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, fish or shellfish) as an ingredient. I have included the allergen statement if it mentions any of these.For the complete listing of allergens and statements see the Halloween Candy List Gluten-Free Allergen-Free 2011. For a quick list of candies that are gluten-free, see the Gluten-Free Halloween Candy Quick List 2011.

Note: Please, as always, double check ingredients. This list is meant as a guide only.

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NOTE for bloggers/organizations/media: Please do not reprint this list without my permission. Linking to it, however, is just fine and dandy! Printing is encouraged for personal use or for schools, etc. I appreciate your consideration of my work.

ANGIE’S ARTISAN TREATS

  • Kettle Corn

 

BAZOOKA (located in New York, NY 800-489-9149)

  • Ring Pops, Push Pops, Baby Bottle Pops

CE DE CANDY (located in New Jersey 908-964-0660)

  • Smarties (only USA, not Canada), Giant Smarties, Mega Smarties, Candy Money, Love Hearts, Smarties in a Pouch, Tropical Smarties, X-TREME Sour Smarties, Easter Smarties, Smarties Parties, Smarties Double Lollies, Smarties Mega Lollies, Smarties Pops, Giant Smarties Pops, Candy Necklace
    • Check if it has been re-bagged for allergen info. If the UPC number on the packaging begins with “0 11206″, you can be assured that the product was packaged in one of Ce De Candy’s manufacturing facilities, and is allergen-free

FARLEY’S AND SATHERS (located in Minnesota 888-247-9855)

  • Brach’s Candy Corn and Gummi Candy Corn(not flavored candy corns)
    • “Packaged on equipment that processes milk, egg, and soy. Milk, egg, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, and soy may be present in the manufacturing or packaging area.”
  • Brach’s Mellowcreme Pumpkins
    • “Packaged on equipment that processes milk, egg, and soy. Milk, egg, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, and soy may be present in the manufacturing or packaging area.”
  • Heide candies – Jujyfruits, Jujubes, Red Raspberry Dollars, Red Hot Dollars Wild Cherry, Heide Gummi Bears
  • Jujyfruits, Jujubes
    • “Packaged on equipment that packages products containing traces of milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein.”
  • Super Bubble and Super Bubble Blast
    • “Manufactured in a facility that manufactures products containing traces of eggs.”
  • Trolli Gummi Bears, Trolli Sour Brite (Frite) Crawlers
    • “Packaged on equipment that packages products containing traces of milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein.”

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