Skiing is more fun now that I don’t eat gluten

Posted on February 25th, 2011 by Alison | Posted in Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance, Symptoms | Read 2 Comments - Add Your Own »

skiingI went skiing this week for the first time since my diagnosis of celiac disease and the beginning of my gluten-free diet more than eight years ago. I used to be an avid skier, starting as a kid on family trips, then in my college days and after with friends. The last time I skied, though I enjoyed it, I was also suffering.

My feet and legs were cramping inside my ski boots, and if you’ve ever worn ski boots you know how stiff they are, so there was really nothing I could do about the cramps but grin and bear it (I cried, however). In addition to the cramping, I was having a difficult time seeing on the slopes. After skiing a bit, I would have to stop because my vision was obscured by white spots in front of my eyes. I would have to wait until I could see again before continuing down the mountain. Being in altitude, I had a hard time catching my breath as many people do, but the lack of air felt like it went deep, and it took a while to recover each time I stopped. All of these difficulties were caused by the anemia I suffered as a result of undiagnosed celiac disease.

That I stopped skiing for many years had nothing to do with these health problems — it’s just that I had kids, and time flew by. But this week I was back at it, and after so many years away from the sport that I loved, several things were clear:

  • I no longer suffer from foot and leg cramps while skiing!
  • I can see! No more white spots, no more loss of vision. More oxygen to my brain!
  • My recovery was much better — I could ski a hard run, and when I stopped I could catch my breath more easily and quickly.
  • Ski equipment is so much better! Except for ski boots, which are still uncomfortable (but not as bad without the cramps). :)

I am older, and not as bold, but I feel good. I see more skiing in my future!

If you suspect you might be suffering from anemia or celiac disease, ask your doctor to get tested. And remember, even if you test negative for celiac disease, you could still have a gluten problem.


What matters most is what’s inside… the stomach

Posted on February 15th, 2011 by Alison | Posted in Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance, Healthy Living | Read 2 Comments - Add Your Own »

attunefoodsbrandam_button“What Matters Most is What’s Inside” — the Attune Foods theme this month — might inspire one to write about seeing the good inside people, to write about not judging a book by its cover, but that’s not where I’m going with this one. I am going to look inside… the stomach!

Every forkful of what you put in your mouth is either inflammatory, contributing to more disease, or anti-inflammatory, contributing to less disease. These are the words of Dr. Tom O’Bryan in a lecture on Unlocking the Secrets of Gluten Sensitivity. What a fascinating way to look at the way we eat. What a black and white way of looking at what we eat! Thinking this way may very well take the enjoyment out of eating altogether, but on the other hand, what value do you place on eating anything you want versus living disease-free?

You’ve heard the saying “All roads lead to Rome.” I once heard a gastroenterologist say “All diseases lead to the stomach”…

To read the rest of this article, please visit me over at Attune Foods. Don’t forget to leave me a comment!


Gluten-free corn-free tortilla recipe

Posted on February 3rd, 2011 by Alison | Posted in Corn Allergy, Gluten Intolerance, Recipes & Cooking Tips | Read 9 Comments - Add Your Own »

laurie-gauguinI am excited to bring you a tortilla recipe from Laurie Gauguin, a personal chef and food writer in the San Francisco Bay Area who specializes in gluten-free cooking. I love that this recipe uses yellow split peas, a great source of fiber and protein. To learn more about Laurie and her services, visit her website: www.lauriegauguin.com.

ALLERGEN-FREE TORTILLAS

This recipe works with a variety of legumes, such as black-eyed peas and split chickpeas. I like using the split peas because they cook up a lovely golden color, and their flavor is sweet and nutty.
gluten-free-tortilla

Like corn tortillas, these become pliable when heated. Pop them in the microwave or warm them in a dry skillet before using. If you like crispy edges, add a little oil to the pan when reheating.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 3/4 cup yellow split peas
  • 1/4 cup long-grain white rice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup water
  • oil for the pan

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Cover the split peas and rice with 2 inches of water. Cover and set aside on the counter overnight.
  2. Drain the peas and rice, then put them into the bowl of a food processor. Add the salt, then process until the mixture is finely chopped, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary.
  3. With the motor running, gradually pour in ½ cup water. Scrape down the sides of the bowl, then continue to process for 3 minutes. The batter should be the consistency of pancake batter (but grainy). If it’s too thick, stir in a spoonful or more of water.
  4. Heat a skillet over medium heat. Once hot, add a thin layer of oil. Pour in 1/3 cup of the batter, then spread it around with a rubber spatula until you have a 7-inch tortilla. Cook for 1-2 minutes, until the tortilla is golden around the edges. Flip and cook 30 seconds to 1 minute more, until bottom side is lightly freckled. Remove from the pan, then repeat the process for the remaining batter.

Yield: 7 tortillas


Kikkoman gluten-free soy sauce – new product

Posted on January 27th, 2011 by Alison | Posted in Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance, Products, Wheat Allergy | Read 8 Comments - Add Your Own »

kikkoman-gluten-free-soy-sauceKikkoman has finally done it — they have created a gluten-free soy sauce. Traditional soy sauce is made with wheat, and is therefore not gluten-free. Wheat-free tamari has been available for years: San-J and Eden Foods are two well-known brands.

To clarify the difference between soy sauce and tamari:
Soy sauce is made from fermented soybeans and wheat. Tamari is made from fermented soybeans and little or no wheat. Tamari is considered richer than soy sauce because of the higher concentration of soybeans.

Some tamari is wheat-free, but many brands of tamari have wheat in them. For example, San-J makes soy sauce (contains 40-60% wheat), tamari (a small amount of wheat), and gluten-free tamari (no wheat).  Kikkoman also makes a Tamari Soy Sauce that contains wheat, so one can’t assume that all tamari is wheat-free.

Kikkoman’s new gluten-free soy sauce is wheat-free, using rice instead of wheat. The ingredients are water, soybeans, rice and salt. What I find interesting is that for years, Kikkoman has claimed that their soy sauce made with wheat is gluten-free by Codex standards, yet they have now come out with a truly gluten-free soy sauce.

Before you get too excited about going out for Asian food again, realize that it’s going to take a while for restaurants to begin using this soy sauce because it needs to be available to them in a large size. Currently there is an almost 1/2 gallon size available for restaurants, but this is small compared to regular soy sauce that comes in 5 gallons! Not only will the available size determine whether or not a restaurant decides to use the gluten-free soy sauce, so will the general availability and the price. Restaurants buy through distributors. If the distributor doesn’t carry the gluten-free soy sauce, then it isn’t available to the restaurants. And the gluten-free soy sauce will probably be more expensive also, deterring restaurants from converting all their dishes to gluten-free.

I still have hope, though, and dream of one day having more choices at a sushi or Chinese restaurant!


Vitiligo and gluten intolerance

Posted on December 14th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance, News & Research, Symptoms | Read 156 Comments - Add Your Own »

Vitiligo and celiac disease is a topic I have been meaning to write about for a while now. I have both, and believe there is a connection between vitiligo and gluten intolerance. I have found out more on this topic from the readers of this blog than any other source out there, and hope that this incredible information reaches those with vitiligo who are told there is no known cause.

Vitiligo is a skin disorder characterized by smooth, white patches on various parts of the body that occur due to loss of pigment. This loss of pigment often starts on the hands, feet and face, and then can progress to other parts of the body. Hair can turn white where there is a vitiligo patch. Vitiligo is not physically painful, but can be quite emotionally devastating as it affects one’s appearance.

The picture below is of me as a child with vitiligo on my face. It appeared symmetrically below my eyes, but asymmetrically on my legs — 8 spots on only one side of my body.

vitiligo1

The spots on my face re-pigmented with the treatment at that time (1973) which was psoralen pills and UV light treatments at Stanford. The spots on my legs remained into adulthood, never getting any bigger or smaller. When I was diagnosed with celiac disease in 2002, I didn’t think about the vitiligo, but over the past years since being on a gluten-free diet, CONTINUE READING »


Halloween Candy List – Gluten-Free Allergen-Free Status – 2010

Posted on October 3rd, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Celiac Disease, Dairy Allergy, Egg Allergy, Food Allergies, Gluten Intolerance, Holidays/Special Events, Peanuts/Nuts Allergy, Products, Wheat Allergy | Read 73 Comments - Add Your Own »

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS FROM 2010. THE 2011 HALLOWEEN LIST IS HERE: Halloween Candy List Gluten-Free Allergen-Free 2011

Here’s the list you’ve been looking for… but first, you get to see the giant spider I made in my yard last year for Halloween! The Home Depot guys cutting the black pipe to my specifications thought I was crazy! The spider is coming out again this year with some modifications (furry perhaps?)

spider1

Now on to the candy…

Each candy shows if its ingredients contains wheat/gluten, milk (dairy), soy, egg, nuts, or peanuts (6 of the top 8 allergens — fish and shellfish are not included since I have not found this to be a concern with candy). I do not include coconut as a tree nut and have not listed coconut as an allergen. I called many of the manufacturers and/or checked their websites for gluten and allergen information,which I have noted at the end of each manufacturer’s section. To print this list, click on the Print icon above the title. If you don’t see the print icon, click on the title of the article first.

Note: Please, as always, double check ingredients and also check with the child’s parents before giving them any candy or allowing them to eat anything! I will not be held liable for any accident occurring due to the use of this list. It is meant as a guide only.

In a hurry? Check out these:
Gluten-Free Halloween Candy Quick List 2010
Allergen-Free Halloween Candy Quick List 2010

NOTE for bloggers: If you are going to post or share this list, would you be so kind as to give me credit and link to me? This took many hours of my life and I even got kicked out of Walgreen’s for taking notes in the candy aisle, so please be considerate of my hard work! :)

Mainstream candy listed by brand, in alphabetical order:

ADAMS & BROOKS

  • Scooby Doo! Fun Pops (lollipops with picture of Scooby Doo)
    • Ingredients free of: peanuts, nuts, egg, milk, wheat/gluten, soy
    • Ingredients contain: no top 8 allergens
    • Package statement: “Packaged in a plant that processes peanuts and tree nuts.”

AIRHEADS

  • Airheads Bars and Airheads Bars Sour
    • Ingredients free of: peanuts, nuts, egg, milk, wheat/gluten
    • Ingredients contain: soybean oil
    • Package statement: “Manufactured in a facility that processes wheat flour”
  • Airheads Xtremes Rolls
    • Ingredients free of: peanuts, nuts, egg, milk
    • Ingredients contain: wheat flour, soybean oil
  • Airheads Xtremes Belts
    • Ingredients free of: peanuts, nuts, egg, milk, soy
    • Ingredients contain: wheat flour, wheat starch
  • Airheads Pops and Whistle Pops
    • Ingredients free of: peanuts, nuts, egg, milk, soy, wheat/gluten
    • Ingredients contain: none of the top 8 allergens

AMERICAN LICORICE CO.

  • Sour Punch Twists
    • Ingredients free of: peanuts, nuts, egg, milk, soy
    • Ingredients contain: wheat/gluten

ANNABELLE’S

  • Big Hunk
    • Ingredients free of: wheat/gluten, milk, tree nuts (see company Gluten-Free info below)
    • Ingredients contain: peanuts, eggs, soy lecithin
    • Package statement: “made in a facility that uses milk, egg, treenuts, wheat and peanuts”
  • Rocky Road
    • Ingredients free of: none of top 8!
    • Ingredients contain: milk, tree nuts (cashews), wheat/gluten (barley malt and wheat flour), soybean oil
    • Package statement: “may contain peanuts, eggs, and flour”
  • Abba Zabba
    • Ingredients free of: tree nuts, eggs, milk, wheat/gluten (see company Gluten-Free info below)
    • Ingredients contain: peanuts, soybean oil and soy lecithin
    • Package statement: “Made in a facility that uses milk, egg, treenuts, wheat and peanuts”
  • Look
    • Ingredients free of: tree nuts, wheat/gluten (see company Gluten-Free info below)
    • Ingredients contain: milk, peanuts, soy lecithin, eggs
    • Package statement: “Made in a facility that uses milk, egg, treenuts, wheat and peanuts”
  • U-No
    • Ingredients free of: peanuts, eggs, wheat/gluten (see company Gluten-Free info below)
    • Ingredients contain: milk, almonds, soy lecithin
    • Package statement: “Made in a facility that uses milk, egg, treenuts, wheat and peanuts”

Gluten-Free info (via phone Sept 2010): The only guaranteed gluten-free candy is the 2 oz. (regular size) Big Hunk. For all other candies, including the mini Big Hunks, there is the possibility of contamination from flour that is used on the belts. While there is no flour used specifically for the Big Hunk minis, there is flour used on the belts for the manufacture of the Look bars.

CONTINUE READING »


Allergen-Free Halloween Candy Quick List 2010

Posted on October 3rd, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Celiac Disease, Dairy Allergy, Egg Allergy, Food Allergies, Gluten Intolerance, Holidays/Special Events, Peanuts/Nuts Allergy, Soy Allergy, Wheat Allergy | Read 21 Comments - Add Your Own »

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS FROM 2010. THE 2011 HALLOWEEN LIST IS HERE: Allergen-Free Halloween Candy Quick List 2011

halloweenpumpkin

This is a 2010 quick list of Halloween candy with ingredients that are gluten-free and free of the top 8 allergens. I have included a package statement if it mentions allergens. For a more complete listing, along with company allergy statements, please read the Halloween Candy List – Gluten-Free Allergen-Free – 2010. For a gluten-free listing only, please read the Gluten-Free Halloween Candy Quick List 2010. To print this list, click on the Print icon above the title. If you don’t see the print icon, click on the title of the article first.

NOTE for bloggers: If you are going to post or share this list, would you be so kind as to give me credit and link to me? This took many hours of my life and I even got kicked out of Walgreen’s for taking notes in the candy aisle, so please be considerate of my hard work! :)

Mainstream candies:

ADAMS & BROOKS

  • Scooby Doo! Fun Pops (lollipops with picture of Scooby Doo)
    • Package statement: “Packaged in a plant that processes peanuts and tree nuts.”

AIRHEADS

  • Airheads Pops and Whistle Pops

CADBURY ADAMS (now part of Kraft Foods)

  • Swedish Fish
  • Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme
  • Sour Patch Xploderz
    • Package statement: “Manufactured in a facility that handles peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, soy and wheat.”

CE DE CANDY

  • Smarties (only USA, not Canada), Smarties in a Pouch, Tropical Smarties, Bubble Gum Smarties, X-TREME Sour Smarties, Smarties Parties, Easter Smarties, Smarties Double Lollies, Smarties Mega Lollies, Smarties Pops
  • Candy Money
  • Love Hearts

FARLEY’S AND SATHERS

  • Super Bubble and Super Bubble Blast
    • Package statement: “Manufactured in a facility that manufactures products containing traces of eggs.”
  • Trolli Gummi Bears, Trolli Sour Brite (Frite) Crawlers
    • Package statement: “Made in allergen-free facility but packaged on equipment that packages products containing traces of milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein.”
  • Jujyfruits, Jujubes
    • Package statement: “Made in allergen-free facility but packaged on equipment that packages products containing traces of milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein.”
  • Brach’s Candy Corn and Gummi Candy Corn (not flavored candy corns — see below)
    • Package statement: “Packaged on equipment that also packages products containing traces of milk, egg, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein.”
  • Brach’s Mellowcreme Pumpkins
    • Package statement: “Packaged on equipment that also packages products containing traces of milk, egg, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, and/or soy protein”
  • Heide candies — Jujyfruits, Jujubes, Cool Grape, Red Raspberry Dollars, Wild Cherry

FERRARA PAN

  • Lemonhead, Red Hots, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead
    • Package statement on some: “This product was manufactured in a facility where peanuts, almonds, milk, cashews, macadamias, pistachios, soy and egg are used in the production of other products.”

FRANKFORD CANDY & CHOCOLATE COMPANY

  • SpongeBob Gummy Krabby Patties
    • Package statement on some: “Manufactured in a facility that processes peanuts, almonds, and wheat.”
  • Gummy Body Parts
    • Package statement on some: “Manufactured in a facility that processes peanuts, almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, milk and soy.”

HERSHEY

  • Jolly Rancher Hard Candy and Hard Candy Sticks

IMPACT CONFECTIONS

  • Warheads Sour Chewy Cubes

JELLY BELLY

  • Jelly Belly Jelly Beans

JUST BORN

  • Mike & Ike
  • Hot Tamales
  • Peeps Pumpkins and Ghosts

NECCO

  • Necco Wafers

RIVIERA

  • Spooky Candy Rings (eyeballs, Frankenstein heads and other shapes on rings)

SPANGLER (may contain traces of soy oil)

  • Dum Dums
  • Chewy Pops
  • Saf-T-Pops
  • Circus Peanuts
  • Candy Canes
  • Chewy Canes

TOOTSIE

  • Dots

WRIGLEY

  • Starburst
  • Skittles, Skittle Sour and Skittle Crazy Cores
  • Lifesavers Hard Candy and Lifesavers Pops
    • Ingredients free of: wheat/gluten, peanuts, nuts, egg, milk, soy (except some flavors, like Butter Rum)
    • Ingredients contain: soy lecithin (some flavors)
  • Lifesavers Gummies, Big Ring Gummies regular and Sweet and Sour

WONKA

  • Bottlecaps, Everlasting Gobstopper, Runts, Fun Dip and Fun Dip Sour, Pixy Stix, Sweetarts (regular), Tart N Tinys, Nerds, Spree
    • Package statement: “Made in a facility that also processes wheat and egg.” (Sweetarts)
  • Giant Chewy Nerds
    • Package statement: “Made on equipment that also processes peanuts, nuts, milk, wheat and soy.”

Natural/specialty candies:

AMANDA’S OWN CONFECTIONS (www.amandasown.com)

  • Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops

ANNIE’S

  • Organic Bunny Fruit Snacks (Flavors: Tropical Treat, Berry Patch, Sunny Citrus, Summer Strawberry)

ENJOY LIFE (www.enjoylifefoods.com)

  • Boom CHOCO Boom Dark Chocolate Bar, Crispy Rice Bar, Milk Bar

INDIE CANDY (www.indiecandy.com)

  • Halloween Chocolate Lollipops, Halloween Crystal Lollipops, Halloween Gummies

PURE FUN (www.organiccandy.com)

  • Halloween Pure Pops
    • Ingredient statement: “Manufactured in a segregated area of a facility that may product products containing nuts.”

SURF SWEETS (www.surfsweets.com)

  • Gummy Worms, Gummy Swirls, Gummy Bears, Fruity Bears, Jelly Beans, Sour Worms, Sour Berry Bears

YUMMY EARTH (www.yummyearth.com)

  • Lollipops, Candy Drop, Gummy Bears, Gummy Worms

Looking for non-candy ideas for Halloween? Read How to have an allergy-free Halloween.


Gluten-Free Halloween Candy Quick List 2010

Posted on October 3rd, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance, Holidays/Special Events, Wheat Allergy | Read 28 Comments - Add Your Own »

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS FROM 2010. THE 2011 HALLOWEEN LIST IS HERE: Gluten-Free Halloween Candy Quick List 2011

spiderweb1

This is a quick list of gluten-free Halloween candy for 2010. This list includes candies that do not contain wheat or gluten as an ingredient. I have included the allergen statement if it mentions wheat or gluten.

Note: Please, as always, double check ingredients and also check with the child’s parents before giving them any candy or allowing them to eat anything! I will not be held liable for any accident occurring due to the use of this list. It is meant as a guide only.

For a more complete listing, along with allergy statements and other allergens, please read the Halloween Candy List – Gluten-Free Allergen-Free – 2010. For a list of candy free of most major allergens, read the Allergen-Free Halloween Candy Quick List 2010. To print this list, click on the Print icon above the title. If you don’t see the print icon, click on the title of the article first.

NOTE for bloggers: If you are going to post or share this list, would you be so kind as to give me credit and link to me? This took many hours of my life and I even got kicked out of Walgreen’s for taking notes in the candy aisle, so please be considerate of my hard work! :)

Mainstream candies:

ADAMS & BROOKS

  • Scooby Doo! Fun Pops (lollipops with picture of Scooby Doo)

AIRHEADS

  • Airheads Bars and Airheads Bars Sour
    • Package statement: “Manufactured in a facility that processes wheat flour.”
  • Airheads Pops and Whistle Pops

ANNABELLE’S

  • Big Hunk
    • Package statement: “made in a facility that uses milk, egg, treenuts, wheat and peanuts”
  • Abba Zabba
    • Package statement: “Made in a facility that uses milk, egg, treenuts, wheat and peanuts”
  • Look
    • Package statement: “Made in a facility that uses milk, egg, treenuts, wheat and peanuts”
  • U-No
    • Package statement: “Made in a facility that uses milk, egg, treenuts, wheat and peanuts”

CADBURY ADAMS (now part of Kraft Foods)

  • Swedish Fish
  • Sour Patch Kids and Sour Patch Extreme
  • Sour Patch Xploderz
    • Package statement: “Manufactured in a facility that handles peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, soy and wheat.”

CE DE CANDY

  • Smarties (USA only, not Canada), Smarties in a Pouch, Tropical Smarties, X-TREME Sour Smarties, Easter Smarties, Smarties Parties, Smarties Double Lollies, Smarties Mega Lollies, Smarties Pops
  • Bubble Gum Smarties
  • Candy Money
  • Love Hearts

FARLEY’S AND SATHERS

  • Super Bubble and Super Bubble Blast
  • Trolli Gummi Bears, Trolli Sour Brite (Frite) Crawlers

    • Made in allergen-free facility but packaged on equipment that packages products containing traces of milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein.
  • Jujyfruits, Jujubes

    • Made in allergen-free facility but packaged on equipment that packages products containing traces of milk, wheat, egg, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein.
  • Now and Later regular
  • Now and Later Soft
  • Brach’s Candy Corn and Gummi Candy Corn (not flavored candy corns — see below)
    • Package statement: “Packaged on equipment that also packages products containing traces of milk, egg, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts and/or soy protein.”
  • Brach’s Caramel Candy Corn, Caramel Apple Candy Corn, Chocolate Caramel Candy Corn
    • Package statement: “Packaged on equipment that also packages products containing traces of milk, egg, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, and/or soy protein”
  • Brach’s Mellowcreme Pumpkins
    • Package statement: “Packaged on equipment that also packages products containing traces of milk, egg, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, and/or soy protein”
  • Heide candies — Jujyfruits, Jujubes, Cool Grape, Red Raspberry Dollars, Wild Cherry

FERRARA PAN

  • Lemonhead
  • Red Hots
  • Chewy Lemonhead and Friends
  • Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends
  • Applehead
  • Grapehead
  • Cherryhead

FRANKFORD CANDY & CHOCOLATE COMPANY

  • SpongeBob Gummy Krabby Patties
    • Package statement: “Manufactured in a facility that processes peanuts, almonds, and wheat.”
  • Gummy Body Parts
    • Package statement: “Manufactured in a facility that processes peanuts, almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, milk and soy.”

HERSHEY

  • Milk Chocolate Bars
  • Milk Chocolate Bars with Almonds
  • Milk Duds
  • Heath Minis
  • Kisses, Special Dark Kisses
  • Almond Joy
  • Mr. Goodbar
  • Baby Ruth
  • Jolly Rancher Hard Candy and Hard Candy Sticks
  • Jolly Rancher Doubles, Pops and Mini-Stix
  • Reese’s
  • Pay Day
  • York Peppermint Patties

IMPACT CONFECTIONS

  • Warheads Sour Chewy Cubes
  • Warheads Extreme Sour Hard Candy

JELLY BELLY

  • Jelly Belly Jelly Beans

JUST BORN

  • Mike & Ike
  • Hot Tamales
  • Peeps Pumpkins and Ghosts
  • Peeps Milk Chocolate and Dark Chocolate Covered Pumpkins

MARS

  • M & Ms Plain
  • M & Ms Peanut
  • Snickers
  • 3 Musketeers and 3 Musketeers Mint
  • Milky Way Midnight Bar
  • Dove Milk Chocolate and Dove Dark Chocolate
  • Dove Peanut Butter

NECCO

  • SkyBar Twilight Saga Chocolate Truffle Heart
  • SkyBar Twilight Saga Peanut Butter Wolf
  • SkyBar Twilight Saga Caramel Cullen Medallion
  • Mary Janes
  • Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses (orange wrapper like taffy with no ingredients)
  • Wafers

NESTLE

  • Butterfinger
  • Raisinets
  • Bit-O-Honey
  • Baby Ruth

PEARSON’S

  • Mint Patties

POPCORN EXPRESSIONS

  • Kettle Corn Snack Bags

RIVIERA

  • Spooky Candy Rings (eyeballs, Frankenstein heads and other shapes on rings)

R.M. PALMER COMPANY

  • Palmer Tricky Treats — Googly Eyes, Boneheads, Pumpkin Patch
    • Package statement: “Manufactured on equipment which also processes wheat, peanut butter and tree nuts.”
  • halloweeneyeballcandyCreepy Peepers (white wrapped balls that look like eyeballs with various colors of eyes and red veins — no ingredients listed on individual pieces)
    • Package statement: “Manufactured on equipment which also processes wheat, peanut butter and tree nuts.”
  • Peppermint Patties
    • Package statement: “Manufactured on equipment which also processes wheat, peanut butter and tree nuts.”

RUSSELL STOVER

  • Marshmallow Pumpkin, Orange Marshmallow Pumpkin, Marshmallow Football
    • Package statement: “Products have been produced on shared equipment with peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat.”
  • Coconut Cream Pumpkin
    • Package statement: “Products have been produced on shared equipment with peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat.”

SPANGLER

  • Dum Dums
  • Chewy Pops
  • Saf-T-Pops
  • Circus Peanuts
  • Candy Canes
  • Chewy Canes
  • Shrek Ogreheads

TOOTSIE

  • Charleston Chew (including minis)
  • Charms Blow Pops, Sweet Pops, Zip-A-Dee Mini Pops, Fluffy Stuff Pops
  • Charms Flat Pops
  • Dots
  • Tootsie Pops
  • Tootsie Rolls and Fruit Rolls
  • Junior Mints
  • Junior Caramels
  • Dubble Bubble Bubble Gum, Tear Jerker Sour Bubble Gum
  • Sugar Babies and Sugar Mama
  • Sugar Daddy
  • Caramel Apple Pops

WONKA

  • Bottlecaps, Everlasting Gobstopper, Runts, Fun Dip and Fun Dip Sour, Pixy Stix, Sweetarts (regular), Tart N Tinys, Nerds, Spree
    • Package statement: “Made in a facility that also processes wheat and egg.” (Sweetarts)
  • Chewy Runts, Chewy Gobstopper, Laffy Taffy Stretchy and Tangy, Giant Chewy Sweetarts, Mini Chewy Sweetarts, Sweetarts Chewy Twists, Chewy Tart N Tiny, Chewy Spree
    • Package statement: “Made in a facility that also processes wheat.” (Giant Chewy Sweetarts)
  • Laffy Taffy, Laffy Taffy Rope, Sweetarts Chew
  • Giant Chewy Nerds
    • Package statement: “Made on equipment that also processes peanuts, nuts, milk, wheat and soy.”

WRIGLEY

  • Starburst
  • Skittles, Skittle Sour and Skittle Crazy Cores
  • Lifesavers Hard Candy and Lifesavers Pops
  • Lifesavers Gummies, Big Ring Gummies regular and Sweet and Sour
  • Hubba Bubba Gum, Glop, Max, Pop

Natural/specialty candies:

AMANDA’S OWN CONFECTIONS (www.amandasown.com)

  • Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops

ANNIE’S

  • Organic Bunny Fruit Snacks (Flavors: Tropical Treat, Berry Patch, Sunny Citrus, Summer Strawberry)

CHOCOLATE DECADENCE (www.chocolatedecadence.com)

  • Chocolate Halloween shapes and chocolate bars
    • except pretzel items

CRISPY CAT

  • Mint Coconut Candy Bar
  • Toasted Almond Candy Bar
  • Chocolate Marshmallow Candy Bar

DIVVIES (www.divvies.com)

  • Boo x2 Chocolate Ghosts
  • BinGo! Divvine Chocolate Bar
  • Benjamint Crunch Bar
  • Halloween Jelly Beans

ENJOY LIFE (www.enjoylifefoods.com)

  • Boom CHOCO Boom Dark Chocolate Bar, Crispy Rice Bar, Milk Bar

INDIE CANDY (www.indiecandy.com)

  • Halloween Chocolate Lollipops
  • Halloween Crystal Lollipops
  • Halloween Gummies

PURE FUN (www.organiccandy.com)

  • Halloween Pure Pops

SURF SWEETS (www.surfsweets.com)

  • Gummy Worms, Gummy Swirls, Gummy Bears, Fruity Bears, Jelly Beans, Sour Worms, Sour Berry Bears

YUMMY EARTH (www.yummyearth.com)

  • Lollipops, Candy Drop, Gummy Bears, Gummy Worms

Looking for non-candy ideas for Halloween? Read How to have an allergy-free Halloween.


Ask the Doc: Positive biopsy but negative blood tests

Posted on September 29th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Ask the Doc, Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance | ADD A COMMENT »

questionmarkgreen1.jpg Q. I suffered my whole entire life with intestinal issues (I am 46). I have been gluten free for over 3 years now, I went in for an upper GI (for gerd) and I had him test me for celiac disease, it came back positive (I had blunted villi). I then went for blood work and all came back negative, on the HLA genetic testing, it came back DR1/DQ5. But listen to this…I lost 3 pregnancies, first one at 8 months gestation, the second and third at 5 months (I had to labor and deliver them all) and they were never able to “officially” tell me why. After I lost my second one (1991) they did blood work and told me I had anticardiolipin antibody syndrome. Two years ago at the age of 44 I was diagnosed with osteopenia (a little on the young side!). Last year I saw a hematologist (for a cosmetic procedure I’m going thru) I gave him my complete history including being gluten-free. He told me that some people who have anticardiolipin antibody syndrome and are then diagnosed with celiac disease, once they go gluten-free, it clears up the anticardiolipin syndrome. He tested all my numbers, and they were indeed negative (first time in 20 some odd years!!). I’m so confused as to what to think about all this! Can you provide any feedback?

A. You are not the first one to have blunted villi and negative celiac serologies. There are many other genes involved in gluten sensitivity and we are not clear on exactly what they are doing.  If you have really been completely gluten-free for the past three years, and your villi are still blunted, you probably have had advanced disease for years, given your infertility and osteopenia. It may take longer for your villi to return to normal, but you must be perfectly gluten-free. If you have been, then you may have refractory celiac disease, and there are other therapeutic options to explore. You should see a gastroenterologist to discuss this further.

Health and happiness,
Dr. Aron

Have a question for the doc?


A brief history of wheat and why it is making us sick

Posted on September 27th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance, Healthy Living, Wheat Allergy | Read 61 Comments - Add Your Own »

grandma98bdayMy grandmother just turned 98 years old. 98! She is amazing, still remembering intricate details about her life. She can still converse on any topic from the state of education to how many times Lance Armstrong has won the Tour de France. She’s also totally up on the whole gluten-free thing, and recently she told me a memory she had from when she was a little girl.

She was in the kitchen where her grandmother and her grandmother’s friends were gathered to bake and talk (my grandmother was raised by her Danish grandparents in South Dakota after her own parents died in the flu epidemic of 1918 when she was 6 years old — what that generation went through is incomprehensible). As they stood around chatting, my grandmother heard her grandmother say, “I like this new flour — it’s got more gluten in it.” Aha! Perhaps there is a history lesson here about why wheat is making people sick! (says the former history teacher)

People often ask me, “Why does it seem that suddenly everyone is intolerant to gluten?” After some research, I have concluded that the phenomenon of celiac disease and gluten intolerance has, in a way, come about rather suddenly. Why? Because gluten is far more prevalent in our society today than just 100 years ago (but a blip on the timeline of human existence). As the consumption of gluten has increased, the problems associated with gluten have too.

wheatgrainWheat today is different than it was 100 years ago. It’s got more gluten in it! Until the 1870s, almost all U.S. wheat production consisted of “soft wheat” varieties. A “hard spring wheat” variety (originally from Central Europe) with a higher protein content (aka gluten) was introduced in the U.S. in the mid-1800s. The flour made from the higher gluten wheat resulted in fluffier bread and flakier baked goods — this was amazing stuff!

The demand for the new flour grew, but it wasn’t so easy to get at first. Although some early types of wheat may have been grown as far back as 9000 B.C., people didn’t each much of it because it was difficult to eat in its raw form, and even when they figured out how to crack it open, to grind it, to sift it and to cook with it, these processes were laborious because they had only primitive tools. Whole grains also went rancid rather quickly because of the high oil content in the bran.

goldmedalflourIt was eventually discovered that milling the grains (stripping away the germ and the bran) made it so the grains could be kept for longer and also produced a soft, unadulterated white flour. By the early 1800s, many mills had equipment so that they could produce this refined flour. Demand for white flour grew as it became the desirable baking ingredient. Because it was more expensive than brown flour, it also became a status symbol.

It wasn’t until the late 19th century that wheat production and consumption grew dramatically. One reason, as mentioned before, was the use of the new, hardier strains of wheat. (Today, wheat can be grown every month of the year somewhere in the world.) Also at this time, great advancements were made in the technology used to grow, harvest, mill and transport wheat. Inventions such as the reaper, the steel plow, and high speed steel roller mills, helped produce huge quantities of finer, whiter flour. Railroads provided better transport of the flour, making it available to more people, and better ovens allowed them to bake with it even more. With all of these advances, the masses had access to the refined wheat flour that was once a luxury of the wealthy.

creamofwheat2They also found new ways to eat wheat. Though eating a big bowl of cereal for breakfast seems the norm today, it was only in the late 1890′s that breakfast cereal was invented as a health food to help people with digestive problems! Kellogg and Post were among the first to come up with processed cereals in the form of flakes, shredded wheat and Grape Nuts. It was around this time that Quaker introduced oatmeal and Cream of Wheat was born. The popularity of cereal continued to rise throughout the decades — the cereal of today is not quite the health food it was once thought to be!

creamofwheat3Though wheat consumption slowed a little bit from 1920 through the Great Depression and World War II, people were encouraged to find alternatives for meat and dairy due to war rationing. Thus, Kraft macaroni and cheese dinner, introduced in 1937, gained popularity during wartime and an entire pamphlet of recipes using Cream of Wheat instead of meat was published, with the slogan “Stretch Your Meat With Cream of Wheat.” The rise and fall in wheat consumption during World War II in five different countries correlated to the increase and decline in the number of schizophrenia patients admitted to hospitals in those countries, according to a 1966 study.

By the time the 1960s and 1970s rolled around, wheat consumption began to rise again. People became concerned with heart disease and cholesterol and whole wheat was viewed as a healthy alternative to combat these health problems. Wheat consumption in the U.S. saw another great increase with the huge rise in the fast food industry in the 70s and 80s. People on the go could now pick up sandwiches, hamburgers, chicken nuggets, pizza, and bagels just about anywhere.

Today, wheat is the single most cultivated crop worldwide. Most people in the United States eat wheat at almost every single meal, every single day, and for snacks and dessert too. Bakers are adding in “vital wheat gluten” or high gluten flour to make fluffier loaves of bread. Vegetarian and vegan meat substitutes are made from extracted gluten. Wheat is everywhere and then some! It’s no wonder we are not tolerating this food that has “suddenly” become our dominant food source.

The body is not built wrongly, but is being used wrongly” proposed T.L. Cleave, author of a 1974 book called The Saccharine Disease, which addressed health conditions that he believed to be caused by sugar and white flour. Rather than viewing people who are unable to tolerate gluten as defective, we need to recognize that it is the change in our environment — the increase in wheat consumption — that has led to our ill health. My grandmother’s memory serves as a reminder of these changes that have occurred in just a short time.

Thank you, Grandma, for inspiring this post. Here’s to 99!