Meet some other bloggers who inspire me

Posted on October 22nd, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Blog Events, Healthy Living, SF Bay Area | Read 3 Comments - Add Your Own »

bhfood10_150Two weeks ago, I attended the BlogHer Food Conference in San Francisco — yes, it’s what it sounds like: female food bloggers getting together to discuss writing about food on the web. But it was much more than that. For me, it was a chance to be inspired by the work that amazing women (and some men too) are doing, and a time to reflect on my own blog and its meaning to me and to others.

The events were really fun, but more important to me were several people there who had a great impact on me — people who are blogging with a higher goal in mind and who are effecting change in their communities. I would like to take this opportunity to introduce some of them to you!

Mrs Q. of Fed Up With Lunch – I really got to spend some quality time with the anonymous Mrs. Q who is eating school lunch every day with her students at the elementary school where she is a teacher, and documenting it with photos and commentary. She had no idea when she embarked on this project that it would garner so much attention, even from Jamie Oliver, the Food Revolution guy himself! Mrs. Q is a down-to-earth, humble, personable and well-meaning person who I hope you get to meet someday (when she reveals her real identity!) And no, I don’t know her real name.

Diana from Dianasaur Dishes — this woman makes you go “wow.” After living on a dollar a day herself in hard times, she learned that she could eat well rather than survive on cheap fast food. Now she teaches others how to do it. As she said at the conference, “Being poor doesn’t mean you have to eat poorly.” I didn’t spend time with her other than a brief introduction, but I really valued her insights when she was a speaker on a panel.

Michelle Stern of What’s Cooking — Michelle is teaching kids to cook healthy food, and to give back to the community and the world! I am proud to live in the same area as this inspiring woman — she’s the reason that my daughter’s elementary school now has a salad bar for kids that buy school lunch (many of these kids are the ones who so need this healthy option!) I look forward to  spending more time with Michelle in the future.

Naomi Starkman of Civil Eats — This is a really smart woman who is really committed to getting people to think critically about our food system. She led the Food Policy panel that I attended, and I learned that I have a lot to learn… but at least I have her website as a resource.

Maria from Nature’s Path Foods — Okay, she’s not a blogger, but she ROCKS! She works in marketing for Nature’s Path because she believes in the ideals of the company. My favorite line of hers in one of the sessions I attended was something like, “It’s time we held the food companies accountable for their actions… who’s with me?” I’m with you Maria! In recent months I have been thinking about how shocking it is that food companies can produce what they produce and actually allow people to eat it! So, yes Maria, I’m totally with you.

Jeffrey Strain of The Penny Experiment — I don’t how many people got to meet Jeffrey, but I happened to sit by him on the shuttle to the after party. Humbly and quietly, he told me about the amazing goal he has set out to achieve with his “Penny Experiment”: to turn one penny into a million dollars of donated food. He has mastered the ways of coupons and is giving all the food he earns to food banks, and is encouraging others to do the same. He even did a challenge where he showed that one could eat well on $1 per day, being creative with coupons (next he wants to try doing it with organic food he told me). Another creative idea he had was to use pennies as the basis for artists to create a piece that he would sell to raise money to buy food for food banks. I just can’t help but admire what this guy is doing.

And of course, there are the gluten-free gals! Some I had met before and some I met for the first time. There were so many of us that the after party held at Le Cordon Bleu cooking school in San Francisco was entirely gluten-free (and delicious)! Boy, did we feel special, and grateful!

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Here are the gluten-free bloggers (and a couple of other food allergy bloggers) that I got to meet or reconnect with — each one of them inspires me in some way:

  • Stephanie O’Dea of A Year of Crockpotting – Love Stephanie! She is so fun and real. If you can’t find her, just listen for her laugh! hee hee. She has another crockpot book coming out in December (you can pre-order now).
  • Ali of Nourishing Meals – Ali is my BlogHer pal for the second year now – I absolutely love her blog, and feel so comfortable hanging out with her. Also, I am currently in love with her maple raspberry scone recipe. She and her husband (he also get the thumbs up!) have a wonderful book called The Whole Life Nutrition Cookbook.
  • Tia of Glugle Gluten Free – Tia is not only a fellow blogger, but she is local to me. She is a rather new blogger and doing a fabulous job!!
  • Wendy of Celiacs in the House — I met Wendy for the first time at the conference. We both attended the Food Policy discussion and had very similar points of view. I look forward to getting to know her blog more.
  • Diane of The W.H.O.L.E. Gang — I met Diane last year and soon found out that she is the organizer! Thanks to her, reservations are made and blog events are held, including my favorite series of hers called 30 Days to a Food Revolution.
  • Shirley of Gluten Free Easily — Shirley is so nice, and she is amazingly thorough in her writing on her blog! I can’t imagine how long she must spend, but I am always in awe!
  • Alisa of Go Dairy Free — I finally got to meet Alisa after reading her blog for years. She started this dairy-free blog after discovering that dairy was causing her to be ill. Hers is THE go-to source for dairy-free info!
  • Ellen of I Am Gluten Free — I remember talking on the phone to Ellen when she was first diagnosed. It was so cool to meet her after all these years. She’s got lots of recipes, including vegan ones.
  • Silvana of Dish Towel Diaries — Silvana was lovely to meet, although I didn’t have much time to talk to her. Her book, Cooking for Isaiah, is full of gluten-free and dairy-free recipes.
  • Shauna of Gluten Free Girl — Shauna was a speaker this year and did a fabulous job. Her new cookbook The Gluten Free Girl and the Chef is one you will want on your shelf!
  • Helene of My Tartlette — Helene was so nice and introduced herself to me, having no idea that we were both gluten-free. Her story of why she is gluten-free is unlike any I have heard yet, and I hope that she will share her story on Sure Foods Living. Note: Not all of the recipes on her blog are gluten-free.
  • Sea of Book of Yum — I met “Sea” last year and didn’t get a chance to talk to her this time, but I am a fan of her blog and her innovative recipes.
  • Elana of Elana’s Pantry — It was great to see Elana again, and I just found out she has a new cookbook coming out: Gluten-Free Cupcakes: 50 Irresistible Recipes  Made with Almond and Coconut Flour! You go, Elana!
  • Gaby of Peanut Free Mama — This fellow food allergy mom is so nice and down-to-earth, and her blog is a great resource. We talk peanuts.
  • Kim of Cook It Allergy Free — Kim is as sweet as can be, and I am so glad to be introduced to her blog which has enticing recipes and beautiful pictures.

I know I have left some people out. While I got to have great conversations with many people, it was also a whirlwind and I felt like I didn’t have enough time to talk to everyone I wanted to (I also had to miss part of the conference, so there was a lot of time lost). Please let me know in the comments if we met! Thanks to BlogHer for putting on such a great event.


A brief history of wheat and why it is making us sick

Posted on September 27th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Celiac Disease, Gluten Intolerance, Healthy Living, Wheat Allergy | Read 61 Comments - Add Your Own »

grandma98bdayMy grandmother just turned 98 years old. 98! She is amazing, still remembering intricate details about her life. She can still converse on any topic from the state of education to how many times Lance Armstrong has won the Tour de France. She’s also totally up on the whole gluten-free thing, and recently she told me a memory she had from when she was a little girl.

She was in the kitchen where her grandmother and her grandmother’s friends were gathered to bake and talk (my grandmother was raised by her Danish grandparents in South Dakota after her own parents died in the flu epidemic of 1918 when she was 6 years old — what that generation went through is incomprehensible). As they stood around chatting, my grandmother heard her grandmother say, “I like this new flour — it’s got more gluten in it.” Aha! Perhaps there is a history lesson here about why wheat is making people sick! (says the former history teacher)

People often ask me, “Why does it seem that suddenly everyone is intolerant to gluten?” After some research, I have concluded that the phenomenon of celiac disease and gluten intolerance has, in a way, come about rather suddenly. Why? Because gluten is far more prevalent in our society today than just 100 years ago (but a blip on the timeline of human existence). As the consumption of gluten has increased, the problems associated with gluten have too.

wheatgrainWheat today is different than it was 100 years ago. It’s got more gluten in it! Until the 1870s, almost all U.S. wheat production consisted of “soft wheat” varieties. A “hard spring wheat” variety (originally from Central Europe) with a higher protein content (aka gluten) was introduced in the U.S. in the mid-1800s. The flour made from the higher gluten wheat resulted in fluffier bread and flakier baked goods — this was amazing stuff!

The demand for the new flour grew, but it wasn’t so easy to get at first. Although some early types of wheat may have been grown as far back as 9000 B.C., people didn’t each much of it because it was difficult to eat in its raw form, and even when they figured out how to crack it open, to grind it, to sift it and to cook with it, these processes were laborious because they had only primitive tools. Whole grains also went rancid rather quickly because of the high oil content in the bran.

goldmedalflourIt was eventually discovered that milling the grains (stripping away the germ and the bran) made it so the grains could be kept for longer and also produced a soft, unadulterated white flour. By the early 1800s, many mills had equipment so that they could produce this refined flour. Demand for white flour grew as it became the desirable baking ingredient. Because it was more expensive than brown flour, it also became a status symbol.

It wasn’t until the late 19th century that wheat production and consumption grew dramatically. One reason, as mentioned before, was the use of the new, hardier strains of wheat. (Today, wheat can be grown every month of the year somewhere in the world.) Also at this time, great advancements were made in the technology used to grow, harvest, mill and transport wheat. Inventions such as the reaper, the steel plow, and high speed steel roller mills, helped produce huge quantities of finer, whiter flour. Railroads provided better transport of the flour, making it available to more people, and better ovens allowed them to bake with it even more. With all of these advances, the masses had access to the refined wheat flour that was once a luxury of the wealthy.

creamofwheat2They also found new ways to eat wheat. Though eating a big bowl of cereal for breakfast seems the norm today, it was only in the late 1890′s that breakfast cereal was invented as a health food to help people with digestive problems! Kellogg and Post were among the first to come up with processed cereals in the form of flakes, shredded wheat and Grape Nuts. It was around this time that Quaker introduced oatmeal and Cream of Wheat was born. The popularity of cereal continued to rise throughout the decades — the cereal of today is not quite the health food it was once thought to be!

creamofwheat3Though wheat consumption slowed a little bit from 1920 through the Great Depression and World War II, people were encouraged to find alternatives for meat and dairy due to war rationing. Thus, Kraft macaroni and cheese dinner, introduced in 1937, gained popularity during wartime and an entire pamphlet of recipes using Cream of Wheat instead of meat was published, with the slogan “Stretch Your Meat With Cream of Wheat.” The rise and fall in wheat consumption during World War II in five different countries correlated to the increase and decline in the number of schizophrenia patients admitted to hospitals in those countries, according to a 1966 study.

By the time the 1960s and 1970s rolled around, wheat consumption began to rise again. People became concerned with heart disease and cholesterol and whole wheat was viewed as a healthy alternative to combat these health problems. Wheat consumption in the U.S. saw another great increase with the huge rise in the fast food industry in the 70s and 80s. People on the go could now pick up sandwiches, hamburgers, chicken nuggets, pizza, and bagels just about anywhere.

Today, wheat is the single most cultivated crop worldwide. Most people in the United States eat wheat at almost every single meal, every single day, and for snacks and dessert too. Bakers are adding in “vital wheat gluten” or high gluten flour to make fluffier loaves of bread. Vegetarian and vegan meat substitutes are made from extracted gluten. Wheat is everywhere and then some! It’s no wonder we are not tolerating this food that has “suddenly” become our dominant food source.

The body is not built wrongly, but is being used wrongly” proposed T.L. Cleave, author of a 1974 book called The Saccharine Disease, which addressed health conditions that he believed to be caused by sugar and white flour. Rather than viewing people who are unable to tolerate gluten as defective, we need to recognize that it is the change in our environment — the increase in wheat consumption — that has led to our ill health. My grandmother’s memory serves as a reminder of these changes that have occurred in just a short time.

Thank you, Grandma, for inspiring this post. Here’s to 99!


Cooking with your kids really works!

Posted on July 7th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Babies & Kids, Healthy Living, Recipes & Cooking Tips | Read 4 Comments - Add Your Own »

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Last night my daughter ate a dinner of pasta (gluten-free) with a sauce of olive oil-sauteed red onions, zucchini, cherry tomatoes, yellow bell peppers and chicken apple sausage. There was nothing left in her bowl… not because she is an amazing kid who eats anything, but because tonight she cooked it with me.

Let me back up a bit and introduce you to Michelle Stern of What’s Cooking. I was introduced to Michelle on Twitter by Stephanie O’Dea, the Crockpot Lady — this is the virtual blogger world that I live in, but we all live in the Bay Area and I now know them as real people. Michelle teaches cooking to kids. She has built a business around it, not because she is a businesswoman as much as she is a teacher, which is where she and I really connected. It turns out that she was a student teacher for a science class at the same high school where I was teaching history. Our paths didn’t cross at that time, but here we are now!

Michelle’s work inspires me to get my kids more involved in cooking and understanding where their food comes from. Her blog is full of great advice… recently she gave two tips for cooking with kids:

  1. “Let go of perfection.” – I don’t know about you, but this is a hard one for me!
  2. “Let kids DO.” – seems obvious, but this is easy to forget.
  3. And I would like to add: “Have patience.” Give them time to learn.

Michelle and I met up for the first time at the farmer’s market where she encouraged me to buy kale to make kale chips (they were yummy!) Her passion has stuck with me since that day, although I really do forget to involve my kids enough in food preparation.

But not last night! Last night my daughter cut cherry tomatoes in half with a serrated knife for the first time. I taught her how to hold the knife, how to hold the tomato and how to cut with a forward and back motion. She was so proud of herself. (If your child isn’t ready to use a sharp knife, you can let him/her use a butter knife to cut olives, as shown in the picture.) She also stood at the stove on a step stool and stirred, as I added each ingredient. The result was that she felt that she cooked the dinner, and so of course she thought it was delicious! (Bonus: little sis also ate most of it, even the yellow peppers, because big sis was eating it!)

Involving your children in the preparation and cooking of healthy food helps them to appreciate it, understand it, and best of all — eat it!


Vegetarians eat a lot of gluten

Posted on May 18th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Gluten Intolerance, Healthy Living | Read 6 Comments - Add Your Own »

When I hear of someone who is vegetarian or vegan and doesn’t feel well, I think of gluten. I have nothing against people who don’t eat meat. I just think that vegetarianism has changed over the years from being about eating grains, fruits and vegetables to eating processed meat alternatives. There is a danger lurking in the meat substitutes that have become so popular, and that danger is gluten.

bocaburgerGluten is a primary ingredient in meat replacement products because of its ability to have the texture of meat. Extracted from wheat, gluten is pure protein, the very part which many people cannot tolerate. In my 20s, I decided to cut down on my meat consumption and Boca Burgers became a common item in my freezer — I loved them and thought I was being healthy. It was also in my 20s that I became sicker and sicker. I’m not blaming Boca Burgers for my downfall– that would be stretching it! But I do think that there is far too much gluten in the average diet, and even in the diets of people who think they are being ultra-healthy by not eating meat.

Just to give an example of how gluten shows up in place of meat, I will compare a hamburger to a Morningstar Farms Veggie Burger:

In a homemade hamburger, there is usually one ingredient: BEEF, and maybe some SPICES.
In a Morningstar Farms Veggie Burger, there are many ingredients involved in making it taste and feel like meat, including gluten ingredients (shown in bold below):

TEXTURED VEGETABLE PROTEIN (WHEAT GLUTEN, SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, SOY PROTEIN ISOLATE, WATER FOR HYDRATION), CORN OIL, SUNFLOWER OIL, EGG WHITES, CONTAINS TWO PERCENT OR LESS OF CORNSTARCH, NATURAL FLAVORS FROM NON-MEAT SOURCES, SOY PROTEIN ISOLATE, AUTOLYZED YEAST EXTRACT, SALT, CARAMEL COLOR, ONION POWDER, SPICES, HYDROLYZED VEGETABLE PROTEIN (CORN, WHEAT, AND SOY), GARLIC POWDER, POTATO STARCH, MALTODEXTRIN, DISODIUM GUANYLATE, DISODIUM INOSINATE, SUCCINIC ACID, SUGAR, NONFAT DRY MILK, SOYBEAN OIL, WHEAT FIBER.

Here are the ingredients of the original Boca Burger that I loved:

WATER, SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE, WHEAT GLUTEN, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF METHYLCELLULOSE, SALT, CARAMEL COLOR, DRIED ONIONS, YEAST EXTRACT, SESAME OIL, HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVOR (NON-MEAT), DISODIUM GUANYLATE, DISODIUM INOSINATE. CONTAINS: SOY, WHEAT, SESAME.

In addition to eating a lot of gluten in these specialty non-meat foods, many vegetarians are also consuming gluten in other foods such as pasta, cereals, crackers, breads and all the other wheat-based foods that are staples in our society.

I write this post as a caution to those who think that they should be feeling better than they do because they eat a vegetarian or vegan diet. It could be what you are eating a lot of that is making you feel worse, not better. I don’t believe that overloading on gluten and soy is a healthy way to live. There are many people living both vegetarian or vegan AND gluten-free.

What do you think? Do vegetarians and vegans eat more gluten than others?


More Food Revolution and getting your kids to eat veggies

Posted on May 4th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Blog Events, Healthy Living | Read 4 Comments - Add Your Own »

Today I am the guest blogger for 30 Days to a Food Revolution, inspired by Jamie Oliver. I share my ideas for making your own salad dressing (ditch the bottle!) and for getting your kids to eat vegetables before dinner.

The Food Revolution is still stuck in my head, and I hope it starts to stick in everyone’s else’s! If you didn’t get to see the T.V. series, you can at least watch Jamie Oliver’s talk on his Food Revolution mission and his wish: “I wish for everyone to help create a strong, sustainable movement to educate every child about food, inspire families to cook again and empower people everywhere to fight obesity.” Yes, yes, yes! Go Jamie and believers in real food everywhere! :)


30 Days to a Food Revolution

Posted on April 27th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Blog Events, Giveaways, Healthy Living, Recipes & Cooking Tips | ADD A COMMENT »

icookrealfoodI hope that many of you got a chance to watch Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution. I found the T.V. series so inspiring, and like Jamie (otherwise known as the Naked Chef for his use of honest, real food) said: “Yes, this is a T.V. show, but it’s real life.”

He succeeded in making change in the school lunch program in a town chosen for its high rate of obesity. His mission — OUR mission — is so important: feed our kids well so that they can live healthy lives. Of course, there needs to be change not only in our lunch programs, but throughout our society. This change won’t come about easily, as we need education, dedication, motivation and of course, money. But it CAN be done and we need to try.

Many bloggers (including me!) are hoping to make a small difference by sharing tips and recipes for cooking real food in 30 Days to a Food Revolution, an online event dreamed up and organized by Diane of The W.H.O.L.E. Gang.

For 30 days, there will be 30 different food bloggers sharing 30 different ways to eat real food.

Less processed food, more real food is the goal! Most of us are living gluten-free or with other special diets, so hopefully you will find a wealth of good stuff to use in your own kitchens, and discover new blogs too.

I will be contributing my tip and recipe on May 4. In the meantime, you can follow these  participating blogs:

There are also prizes to win! Go to the 30 Days to a Food Revolution page to see the details about how to enter.


Bitter taste in your mouth? Could be pine nuts!

Posted on April 19th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Healthy Living, News & Research, Symptoms | Read 17 Comments - Add Your Own »

pinenutsChalk this one up to Weird Food Reactions that your doctor doesn’t know about…

I went out the other night with some girlfriends and as we were deciding what to order, one of them complained to me that everything she has been eating for three days tastes bitter and leaves a metallic aftertaste. Worried that this was a sign of a health problem, she had emailed her doctor who recommended she check with her dentist first. The doctor also suggested that perhaps the bitter taste was a result of her body detoxing because she had started a gluten, dairy and sugar-free diet. (huh? makes no sense to me.)

This is where I come in:
“Did you eat pine nuts?” I asked her.
“Yes… why??”
“It’s the pine nuts.”
“What? The pine nuts? Yes, well, I did have a lot of pine nuts a couple of days ago. It’s the pine nuts?”
“Yep.”
HOW do you know that?”
“Because it happened to me.”

About two years ago I experienced the same thing. I suddenly had a bitter taste in my mouth whenever I ate something. Didn’t matter what it was — something sweet or sour, fruit, vegetables, wine or chips. Every single thing I ate tasted bitter. After it went on for a few days, I feared that this was some permanent condition and I would never enjoy eating food again! I finally turned to Google and found a forum of people discussing the bitter taste and they all realized that they had eaten pine nuts in the days prior to the bitter taste starting. I was surprised to find the cause, as were all the people in the online forum — and I was relieved! It lasted a week, and was really annoying, but at least I knew it would go away. And I didn’t pay to see any specialists!

I’m not sure if I have eaten any pine nuts since then. We don’t have any nuts in our house due to my daughter’s nut allergy, and I don’t remember if I have eaten them out at a restaurant. I had sort of forgotten about this until hearing my friend’s story, and wondered how common this really is. Back to Google again to find out more…

It turns out that quite a few people have written about “Pine Mouth,” as they began calling it, since my first query years ago. A search of the medical journals turned up a 2010 article in the Journal of Medical Toxicology that concluded: “‘Pine mouth’ appears to be an emerging problem.”

The symptoms generally come on 2 days after ingesting the pine nuts, and can last up to 2 weeks! Though there has been no formal connection made, it seems that the people who were affected by pine mouth ate pine nuts that were imported from China. The China Tree Nut Association even held a national pine nut conference on November 24th, 2009, to try to find out where the bitter taste comes from!

Trader Joe’s and Costco brands were mentioned often in the forums that I read. No conclusion has been made as to WHY this happens and whether some people are affected by it, while others aren’t.

So, if you’re pining for pine nuts, be aware that you might just be left with a bitter taste in your mouth!


Lifefactory glass bottle winners!

Posted on March 27th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Giveaways, Healthy Living | Read 2 Comments - Add Your Own »

First, I would like to say thank you for the nice comments about my website and about the beverage bottles! My husband and I had a lot of fun doing this giveaway together.

lifefactorybottleAnd now… congratulations to the randomly chosen winners of a Lifefactory Glass Beverage Bottle in the color of their choice! The winners are:

Shelley Silva – Spring Green!

Betty Lyle – Spring Green! Happy birthday!

Robin – Midnight Blue!

Don’t forget that you can still get a 15% discount by entering go glass when you purchase any of the bottles from the Lifefactory website. Go Glass!


WIN the coolest glass beverage bottle from Lifefactory!

Posted on March 22nd, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Giveaways, Healthy Living, Products | Read 115 Comments - Add Your Own »

bottlesbeverageI am so excited to tell everyone about the new glass beverage bottles from Lifefactory, and do a giveaway to THREE lucky readers! I have been using one of the bottles (the orange one) for the past few months now and I LOVE it. I was privileged to get one before they were available to the public because (disclosure alert!) my husband works for Lifefactory, and I demanded that I have one!

So, let me tell you about these and why you’re going to want one…

In case you missed it, they are GLASS. Yes, glass. You are most likely currently drinking out of a plastic (need I say it?) or a metal (that tastes like metal) water bottle. Besides the great environmental and health reasons why this new bottle is a necessity, the #1 reason I like this bottle is TASTE. My water tastes like water! I would never choose to drink from plastic or metal at home, and now I get to drink from glass when I am in my car, taking a water break from a volleyball game, hanging out at the park with my kids, or attending an all-day conference. I also love that the bottle has a wide mouth so I can easily drop ice cubes in. (I hurt my hand trying to whack ice cubes into my old metal drinking container.)

You might still be wondering how a glass bottle is going to make it to all of these things without breaking. The bottle has a non-toxic tight-fitting silicone sleeve that protects it from breaking, and also gives you a good grip on the bottle. The sleeves are brightly colored with a cool, modern design. My bottle attracts attention wherever I go! You don’t need to take the sleeves off of the bottles — just put the whole thing in the dishwasher. My daughters have been using the Lifefactory baby bottles as water bottles (with caps instead of nipples) every day in their lunches to school for about two years now, and they still look brand new (and they haven’t broken them).

To win a 22 ounce glass beverage bottle from Lifefactory, please leave a comment choosing which color you would want. The colors are: Midnight Blue, Orange, Pearl White, Red, Sky Blue, and Spring Green. I will choose THREE winners at random. You have until Friday, March 26 at 5pm PST to comment (only one comment per person please). I will notify the winners on Saturday.

For those of you who don’t win, or would like to purchase more bottles, you can get 15% off the Lifefactory online store by using the discount code: go glass (with a space).

GOOD LUCK!


Osteoporosis drug could make bones break

Posted on March 8th, 2010 by Alison | Posted in Healthy Living, Symptoms | Read 1 Comment - Add Your Own »

fosamaxThe osteoporosis drug Fosomax which is supposed to strengthen bones may in fact cause spontaneous fractures, with many women’s femurs actually snapping, according to a report on ABC news. One doctor explains the problem: “When [women] are on it for five, six, seven or eight years, they lost their ability to remodel and regenerate their skeleton,”… and so the women “are very vulnerable and they will then develop problems of brittle bone.” The drug has also been linked to osteonecrosis of the jaw, a bone disease known as “Dead Jaw.”

I found this report so disturbing! And then I read the comments below the article on the ABC News website… all these people talking about their broken femurs! I can’t believe this drug is on the market.

Another thought I have is: how many of the people being prescribed medication have been tested for celiac disease? In my opinion, this is another example of doctors treating a symptom with medication without looking for the cause. People with celiac disease are at a greater risk for developing osteoporosis or osteopenia — in fact, it is a very common symptom. If you have osteoporosis or osteopenia, please go get tested for celiac disease! Even women without any known bone issues have been prescribed the drug. If you are taking Fosomax (alendronate sodium), please check with your doctor about the risks that may be associated with this drug!

To read the original article, go to ABC News. Don’t forget to read the comments.