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Gluten and skin diseases

Posted on June 19th, 2012 by Alison Read 7 Comments - Add Your Own »

The association between celiac disease and the skin condition Dermatitis Herpetiformis has been understood for quite some time, but a newly published article outlines the associations between gluten and other skin manifestations. The article “Celiac Disease and Dermatologic Manifestations“, put out by the Division of Dermatology in Florence, Italy, concludes that anyone suffering from psoriasis, alopecia areata, chronic urticaria, Hereditary angioneurotic edema, atopic dermatitis, or Cutaneous Vasculitis be screened for Celiac Disease.

They also reviewed other skin diseases for their possible relationship to gluten, and in the conclusion they state: “Although in none of these cases has been effectively demonstrated a pathogenetic link between the diseases, some of these associations are more common. Particularly lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, vitiligo, Behcžet disease, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, and also both skin and mucosal manifestations of lichen. Besides the importance of the diagnosis of DH [Dermatitis Herpetiformis], that is virtually always associated to CD and can be considered a specific marker of the disease, even the identification of the other dermatological conditions associated with gluten sensitive enteropathy could be significant, highlighting the importance of a close collaboration between gastroenterologists and dermatologists. In fact,many skin diseases reported in this paper are actually more common in the celiacs or show atypical clinical presentation often associated with resistance to standard therapies in those patients.”

If you or someone you know is suffering from a skin condition, think about gluten. This article focuses on celiac disease, but as those of us in the gluten-free community know, these same symptoms apply to people with gluten sensitivity.

The entire review article can be accessed here: Celiac Disease and Dermatologic Manifestations.

Please leave comments about your experience with gluten and skin.

Comments

  1. They won’t listen to me. :-(

  2. Have you seen anything about the skin condition granuloma anularae with celiac?

  3. what a great post! how interesting!

  4. Skin is your body’s largest organ. It serves as a protective barrier between your insides and the rest of the world, helps regulate body temperature and acts as a filter. Skin exists in a constant state of growth, with old cells dying as new cells are forming. It’s affected by every aspect of your life, from what you eat to where you live. Healthy skin is better able to fight signs of aging, heals much faster and staves off potential disease better than unhealthy skin

    To keep your face looking as youthful as possible, you need to properly cleanse, exfoliate and moisturize your skin while never leaving the house without at least 30 SPF sunscreen. But before we go there, how you care for your skin is utterly dependent on the type of skin you have: oily, normal/combination, dry, sensitive or sun- damaged.

    To know more about skin care products and to availe them at your door step please do google expressmeds247. They are the best discounted, budget, and leading generic medicine providers today.

  5. I think you should link this post to the one you did about vitiligo a while back. And for the person who says “they won’t listen to me”–I so understand your situation. Try bringing a printout of this medical article to your dermatologist. There is a chance he/she will pay attention to it.

  6. I’m also very interested in the question about granuloma anularae.

  7. I suffer from Chronic Angioedema and Urticaria (for almost 9 years now). My Nutritionist believes it’s been caused by the years of damage done by undiagnosed gluten intolerance. She thinks the enzymes that break down Histamine can’t get through the inflammation and damage to do their job.

    Additionally, I have also had granuloma anularae.

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