My daughter has a new allergy and you might be surprised at this one

Posted on May 21st, 2012 by Alison | Read 44 Comments - Add Your Own »
Lentil Allergy Reaction

About a month ago, I gave my daughter a new soup to try: Amy’s Lentil Soup. It is delicious with quality ingredients and she ate it up one day after school, before gymnastics. I added cooked rice to it and it made a great powerhouse snack! The next week I made it for her dinner, again with rice. I think she ate two bowls, she liked it so much. Then it all went downhill…

Within a minute of finishing the soup, her voice changed and she began to have trouble breathing. She was having an asthmatic reaction. No hives, no redness, but she instantly didn’t feel well and wanted to go to bed (it was still early). I immediately gave her Benadryl and as we headed to her bedroom, she said, “Mom, bring my emergency kit.”

Because I grew up with asthma, I recognized the asthmatic breathing she was experiencing, and got an inhaler that we had been prescribed by our pediatrician but had never used. I thought to myself, “If this doesn’t work, I’ll use the Epi.” And I was racking my brain as to why she was having this reaction, though my instinct told me it was lentils since everything else in the meal was foods she had had many times before. I also knew that lentils are a legume and since she is allergic to peanuts which are also legumes, I thought there could be a connection.

After a few puffs on the inhaler, her breathing began to normalize, but slowly. Eventually her breathing was clear as she fell to sleep, exhausted by what her body had just been through. Now I know that many doctors and knowledgeable food allergy people would have advised using the Epi Pen right away, but there’s still part of me that is scared to use it, and I felt that I should try the other medications first. Luckily they worked.

Once she was asleep, I headed to the computer for answers. Sure enough I found myself in peanut allergy forums where moms were discussing the other legumes that their children were allergic to. It seemed that lentils and chickpeas were the most common legumes that peanut-allergic kids reacted to. Several of the forum members quoted the statistic of 20% of peanut allergic children being allergic to lentils or other legumes (but my allergist thinks this statistic is too high). I had never considered that lentils could be a problem, but here I was now realizing that she was probably allergic to them. I lost it. I mean I really lost it. I cried — hard. My husband was out of town and I felt alone with this knowledge and I couldn’t get a handle on my emotions. Luckily I was able to call another mom with allergic kids who could understand what I was feeling. She talked me down, but mostly just listened and was there for me on the other end of the line.

The next day I made an appointment with the allergist to test for the lentil allergy. We couldn’t get in until weeks later and I was told to avoid lentils until we could do the testing. Last Friday was the day. That morning, I called Amy’s Kitchen. I figured I should know every ingredient in that soup before we went in, and “spices” was listed as the last ingredient. Here is where I give a big plug for Amy’s: I have always loved this company and now I like it even more. The customer service person (key word here: person) understood my needs and immediately escalated my call. Though companies don’t always like to share their ingredients, because it’s like giving away their recipe, she did tell me what the “spices” in the soup were so that I could have that information to best take care of my child.

That afternoon I took my daughter to the allergist. I brought the lentil soup in one container and straight lentils that I had cooked in another container. They literally put the suspected allergens into the skin on the back to see if there is a reaction. The doctor used a commercial lentil solution for testing also. We tested a few other things while we were there too.

The results: she reacted strongly to both the lentil soup and the straight lentils. Those are the two top left wheals on her back in the picture. She did not react to the commercial lentil extract, leading both the allergist and me to believe that fresh lentils are certainly more potent and allergenic than their extract. The third wheal you see in the picture is the positive control — they purposely give histamine to make sure the person will react to something if allergic (if someone has taken antihistamines, it can affect the test). The other pricks were to rule out other ingredients in the soup (celery, for example) and retesting some other allergens.

My daughter was a trooper through the whole thing, but in the car on the way home it hit her that there is yet another food she is not allowed to have and that she has to watch out for. It breaks my heart. I hope they find a cure for food allergies in her lifetime!

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Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin June 2012 Meeting

Posted on May 13th, 2012 by Alison | Read 1 Comment - Add Your Own »

gigofmarin1Tips and Techniques from Gluten Free Chefs

Our next meeting of the Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin will take place on Tuesday, June 5th at 7:00.

If you are new to gluten free cooking and want to know where to start or if you’re already cooking gluten free and looking for fresh inspiration, please come to our next meeting to hear from three local chefs, all of whom discovered their own gluten intolerance when they were well into their food-related careers.

Our panel of chefs has a broad range of experience from cooking in restaurants, to directing a cooking school, to food styling.  Uniting them all is the journey each has made to adapt their professional cooking careers to meet the needs of gluten free eaters, including themselves.

Amy Fothergill trained at Cornell University and enjoyed a varied career as a restaurateur, caterer, and food service manager.  FothergillHer daughter was put on a gluten free diet in 2007. Applying her cooking experience to this new gluten-free cuisine, Amy created recipes that satisfied not only her daughter but everyone who tried them.

To better understand the customers in her gluten-free cooking classes, Amy changed her own diet to gluten-free. Within a week, she felt lighter, had better digestion and was sleeping better.  Based on how much better she felt she committed to gluten-free living a month later. In the following years, Amy’s son and husband also switched to eating gluten free.  Her family does not have celiac disease but each family member had found their gastrointestinal and other symptoms relieved by eliminating gluten. Chef Amy now considers herself an advocate for gluten-free living and cooking. She is currently working with Second Helping, a new gluten-free frozen food company to help create delicious, gluten-free food for the consumer market.

Jeffrey Larsen is a food stylist, recipe developer, pastry chef and cooking instructor, specializing in allergen free cooking and baking. As a food stylist, he Jeff Larsonassisted on nine books for Williams Sonoma and has worked on almost every issue of Sunset Magazine for the last ten years. His allergen free journey started 10 years ago when he began developing recipes for his dairy and gluten intolerant mother mother who lives in Montana and had absolutely no support and no information when she received her diagnosis. In helping his mother, Jeffrey gave himself a head start when he discovered that he is also gluten intolerant. In addition to teaching, Jeffrey now consults with individuals and businesses on developing menus and creating allergen free kitchens. He recently developed the breakfast menu for a new gluten free inn in Napa, Inn on Randolph.

Laurie Gauguin has been cooking professionally for restaurants and catering companies as well as for doctors and dieticians and as culinary director of a health-focused Laurie Gauguincooking school. When her health started to wane, she consulted several doctors, but no one was able to determine what was wrong. “I felt miserable every time I ate, and many nights I spent curled up in the fetal position, feeling depressed and listless,” says Gauguin. Through her own elimination diet she discovered her gluten intolerance.  Laurie’s mission became to help gluten-intolerant people celebrate their newly-found health by embracing the enormous variety of foods that will keep them healthy. “I show people that eating deliciously on a gluten-free diet is not only possible, but doable for everyone.” Visit Laurie’s blog for recipes and tips about shopping at the farmer’s market.

 

This meeting will offer a rare chance to meet all three of these trail-blazing gluten free chefs and learn practical tips and techniques that you can put to work in your kitchen.  Don’t miss it! 

You can RSVP here or on our Facebook page.  RSVPs help us plan logistically for the meeting, but if you haven’t RSVP’d, please come anyway!  You are always welcome.

This is an excellent meeting to bring friends or family who are new to gluten free living!  Our speakers will offer many practical ideas plus their energetic and positive approaches to living gluten free.  Please spread the word about this meeting.  You can find a flyer for distributing or posting by visiting our website and clicking on GIG of Marin Flyers For Mailing or Printing on the banner across the top. 

Please let your gluten free friends and family know about this fun event. The meeting is free; however, we appreciate a donation of $5 or more to cover the costs of renting the meeting room, printing the handouts, etc.

Whether you have celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, or are learning more about gluten free living for yourself, family or friends, we welcome you to the GIG of Marin. New members, friends, and loved ones are always welcome.

The Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin will meet:

  • Tuesday, June 5
  • 7:00 to 9:00pm
  • Community Room at Corte Madera Town Center (upstairs at PF Chang’s end) 770 Tamalpais Dr. Suite 201, Corte Madera, CA, 94925

We look forward to seeing you!

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Gluten-free dairy-free ice cream pie

Posted on April 26th, 2012 by Alison | Read 2 Comments - Add Your Own »

Pizza and cupcakes, pizza and cupcakes — this is the usual fare at children’s birthday parties. I’ve got the whole bring-our-own-cupcakes thing down and I am used to delivering hot homemade pizza to the parties. But once in a while, a creative mom throws me for a loop by serving frosting-filled ice cream cones (that was an easy one, luckily) or ice cream sandwiches (the traditional dark cookie rectangle kind – not so easy).

GF DF Ice Cream Pies

At the last birthday party my daughters attended, the dessert was ice cream pie. I used to love ice cream pies but really had never made one. Ah – a new challenge. I used allergen-free cookies and dairy-free ice cream to make individual pies for my girls. The crust turned out fine, although probably too crumbly if you were going to try to cut and serve it. Since they had their own it didn’t matter and they ate them straight out of the baking tin.

Here’s how I did it:

Ingredients:

Directions:

  1. Crush cookies using a food processor (this is the easy and fast way and produces a finer crumb) or by putting them in a plastic bag and rolling the bag with a rolling pin. You should have about 1 to 1 1/2 cups of crushed cookies.
  2. Melt about 1/4 cup of butter.
  3. Add butter little by little to the crushed cookies either directly to the food processor or in a bowl. You want the cookie/butter mixture to stick together enough but not to be too oily. Many cookie crust recipes call for sugar to be added also, but I left it out. Seems sugary enough to me!
  4. Press cookie/butter mixture into the bottom of a greased pie plate or ramekin or whatever you want to serve it in.
  5. Put crust in the freezer to set for at least 15 minutes (more time is better, but I was in a hurry).
  6. Take out the ice cream to soften a bit (10 minutes).
  7. Smooth the softened ice cream into the crust.
  8. Melt chocolate chips (if you do this in the microwave, cook for short intervals and stir each time). Drizzle the chocolate on top of pie.
  9. Return pie to freezer. It is best to leave it for at least 30 minutes or longer.

To be honest, I didn’t see my kids eat their pies because I had to leave the party, and I doubt they were perfect by ice cream pie standards, but the tins came back clean. That’s all the proof I need! If I make this again I would like to buy mini pie dishes, use a more interesting ice cream flavor and make it farther ahead so they freeze more.

So, moms, what’s the next birthday challenge? ;)

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So Delicious debuts Almond Milk products

Posted on April 3rd, 2012 by Alison | ADD A COMMENT »

Every year in March I attend Natural Products Expo West, which is a trade show featuring the foods, beauty care and lifestyle products in the natural foods industry (all the brands you see in So Delicious Almond Milk ice creamWhole Foods and other natural foods stores and the companies that are trying to get their products in to those stores). It is a really fun time seeing people I know and getting to try all the new foods that my favorite brands, and new brands, are showcasing. I am on the hunt at these shows, looking for gluten-free and other foods that cater to special diets. I will be posting about some of the new products I sampled, and first up is one for you dairy-free folks out there…

So Delicious is a brand known for its milk-alternative products, such as soy and coconut beverages, yogurts and desserts. They have added another dairy-free option to their line with Almond Milk products, which they say are lower in calories, fat, sodium and sugar. They are dairy, soy and gluten-free (with the exception of Cookies n Cream ice cream and the ice cream sandwich).

So Delicious Almond Milk BarHere are the new products I saw and tasted at the show:

  • Greek-Style Cultured Almond Milk in Blueberry, Chocolate, Plain, Strawberry and Vanilla
  • Ice Creams – Butter Pecan, Cherry Amaretto, Chocolate, Cookies n Cream, Mint Chip, Mocha Almond Fudge, Vanilla
  • Frozen Dessert Novelties, including chocolate covered Vanilla Bar, Mocha Almond Fudge Bar and Vanilla Ice Cream Sandwich

They were all so delicious! :)

Now, as a mother of a child with a nut allergy, I was concerned that the coconut milk products we normally eat might be contaminated now that almonds are part of the line. We LOVE So Delicious coconut milk products and would be sad to have to give them up. From the email I received from the company, it looks like we won’t have to:

Like all other non-dairy beverages, our almond milk products are produced in some of the same facilities where dairy, soymilk, and our coconut milk are produced. With this in mind, our team takes the cleanliness of the production facility, prevention from cross-contamination, and validation of the allergen-free status of our products extremely seriously.

Many of our customers have food sensitivities and food allergies, and they have come to rely upon us for more than two decades to provide safe and delicious food options for their families. So Delicious® Dairy Free is a market leader in allergen testing and a world-class benchmark for food integrity. We apply strict quality-control measures, which are noted as the most stringent in the industry, in an effort to prevent contamination by undeclared food allergens. To assure our preventative measures are effective, we sample test our products for the presence of allergens using state-of-the-art testing methods.

Our allergen testing is trusted by allergen organizations and thousands and thousands of households, because we have a documented and regimented program that is instituted at every facility where we produce So Delicious® Dairy Free. It involves some of the most rigorous testing in the world, and that testing is conducted at various stages of production–from testing the raw materials and ingredients to the manufacturing lines to the final product. We ensure that the product that is shipped into stores is safe and of the highest quality. And we test all of our allergen ingredients down to 5 parts per million. Just to give you some perspective, the FDA allows companies to declare they are gluten-free if they test to 20 parts per million. But we are committed to testing that is four times as sensitive.

To learn more about our allergen-prevention program visit us at: http://sodeliciousdairyfree.com/allergen-information

If you are dairy-free, and even if you aren’t, this new product line will be a welcome addition to your diet!

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Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin April 2012 Meeting

Posted on March 19th, 2012 by Alison | ADD A COMMENT »

gigofmarin1Cold Sores, Grooves on Your Teeth or Gum Recession? Gluten Intolerance Can Manifest in the Mouth

Our next meeting of the Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin will take place on Monday, April 16th at 7:00.

Many people, including dentists, are surprised to learn that gluten intolerance can manifest with symptoms in the mouth such as:

  • Enamel defects, including pitting, yellowing, calcification, grooves
  • Ulcers or cold sores
  • Pointy or crooked teeth
  • Cavities
  • Gum recession
  • Infections

Come learn more about how problems in the teeth and mouths of children and adults can be indications of gluten intolerance. Our speaker will be Micheal Lipelt, DDS. In addition to a degree in dentistry from UCLA, Dr. Lipelt is trained as a naturopath and dental acupuncturist. Dr. Lipelt is the founder of Stillpoint Family Health Service in Sebastopol. Dr. Lipelt will discuss how gluten intolerance can affect the mouth and teeth, and explore common dental procedures, their impact on gut and overall health, and lab tests which use the oral cavity as a specimen source, one of which is testing for gliadin antibodies.

Also joining us will be Heather Hardcastle owner of Flour Craft Bakery. Heather has been gluten free herself since 2000. Her products are sold at gourmet markets throughout the bay area including Whole Foods and the Marin Farmer’s Market.

Please let your gluten free friends and family know about this fun event. The meeting is free; however, we appreciate a donation of $5 or more to cover the costs of renting the meeting room, printing the handouts, etc.

Whether you have celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, or are learning more about gluten free living for yourself, family or friends, we welcome you to the GIG of Marin. New members, friends, and loved ones are always welcome.

As always, we request that you RSVP to this event by emailing us at: glutenfreemarin@yahoo.com.

The Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin will meet:

  • Monday, April 16th
  • 7:00 to 9:00pm
  • Community Room at Corte Madera Town Center (upstairs at PF Chang’s end) 770 Tamalpais Dr. Suite 201, Corte Madera, CA, 94925

We look forward to seeing you!

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If you carry EpiPens, please read this

Posted on February 27th, 2012 by Alison | Read 9 Comments - Add Your Own »

A friend of mine, who is also a mom of a child with food allergies, talked to me recently about how  she has not been diligent about taking the EpiPen with them wherever they go, and about how her husband hasn’t taken responsibility for bringing the emergency medication when he takes the child somewhere. They know they should, but they forget, or they haven’t totally accepted the fact that the EpiPen might be the thing that saves their child’s life someday. I get it — I was in the same boat a while ago.

We had EpiPens, we had Benadryl, but it was hanging around our house in different places. Sometimes it would go in my purse, or be stashed in a compartment in my car, or thrown into whatever bag we were carrying that day. My husband didn’t know where it was, and how scary to think what would have happened if I wasn’t around in an emergency to find it.

After a few close calls of our own, and a few heart-wrenching news stories of kids who died because the medicine was not accessible, I realized that I may not be able to control everything she eats (though I try!), but I can make sure that treatment is available should an accident happen.

When a seven-year old with food allergies died, it hit me hard, and I had a heart-to-heart with my seven-year old daughter, sharing the little girl’s tragic story with her, and talking to her about taking responsibility for her own safety. I told her how sad I would be to lose her and that she needed to keep herself safe by 1) not eating anything that could possibly be unsafe and 2) carrying her medication with her at all times. Since then, she has been much more careful with food and diligent about making sure her emergency kit is with her at all times.

And that brings me to the point of this article. You can’t expect the child (or other family members) to be responsible about the emergency medication without providing some organization first. You need to have consistency.

First, get a carrier of some kind. When I set out to write this article, I meant to highlight the carriers I use but it turns out that they are no longer available. The ones I use were made by AllergyKids. They are flourescent green with a big AllergyKids logo on it, they zip and they are roomy enough for a couple of epi-pens and other medication like Benadryl. I like that they are brightly colored so anyone who knows us knows that the bright green bag has the emergency medication in it. I also wrote my daughter’s name is black Sharpie pen in large letters on the bag. There is no mistaking this bag for anything else. You can spot it from far away and find it easily within my daughter’s backpack or anywhere else we might put it. If you can’t find a brightly colored bag like I did, at least buy a few bags with the same pattern so that everyone knows which bags are the Epi bags.

Then, make sure you have a consistent place to keep it in your house, ideally near the front door so that it is easy to remember and easy to grab. We keep one of the bags in my daughter’s backpack and we have another one in the house in my daughter’s “inbox.” We know to look there for the pack when we are going somewhere. She knows to look there also, and even her little sister is always on the lookout for the emergency pack.

You need to find a system that works for you, but have a system!

I found many companies that sell Epi-Pen bags of all styles and colors. Here are some of them:

Allergy Apparel

OneSpot Allergy

BlueBear Aware

Moxie Pouches

Etsy

Let me know if you have a system that works for your allergic child!

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Valentine’s Cookies (gluten-free, allergen-free)

Posted on February 8th, 2012 by Alison | Read 2 Comments - Add Your Own »
Gluten-free Valentine's Cookies

These are the gluten-free allergen-free Valentine’s cookies that my girls and I made last year. This picture makes me happy because of the beautiful imperfection created by their little hands!

After years of experimenting with different people’s recipes, I finally have had success. For roll out sugar cookies that maintain their shape and taste good, I recommend two recipes. One is Adventures of a Gluten-Free Mom’s Cut-Out Sugar Cookies. I followed the recipe for the cookies exactly, except for almond extract due to nut allergies in my house, and I just use regular powdered sugar to make the icing, but if you need to be corn-free, she has a great recipe for powdered sugar without the cornstarch. The other recipe I recommend is Cybele Pascal’s Allergy Free Rolled Sugar Cookies. Note that she uses rice milk for the icing, but I personally don’t like the taste of rice milk and think it makes frosting taste “off.” You can use water, milk or coconut milk instead if you are like me and prefer something other than rice milk.

Remember when decorating cookies that you want to put the sprinkles on right away because the icing will set and then the sprinkles won’t stick. Also remember that you really can’t go wrong if you put out little bowls of sprinkles and let your kids exercise their creativity (I do recommend frosting them yourself however!) If you use sprinkles that complement each other, the cookies will look great no matter what and they will be so proud to serve them to their family, friends, and classmates.

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Two California summer camps for gluten-free kids – register now

Posted on January 29th, 2012 by Alison | ADD A COMMENT »

Treat your child to a week of gluten freedom at a special summer camp! There are two California camps – Camp Celiac in northern California, and the new Children’s Celiac Camp in southern California.

CAMP CELIAC

In northern California at Camp Celiac, “campers, counselors, and volunteers eat delicious gluten-free food and do camp activities such as a ropes course, rock climbing, ziplining, boating, swimming, and outdoor sports. Three meals a day without having to ask if any of the foods are gluten-free is life-changing for many campers and staff!” Ages 9-17.

There will be two weeks (each with a different group of campers):

Week 1:  Tuesday, July 24 – Saturday, July 28, 2012
Week 2:  Saturday, July 28 – Weds, August 1, 2012

To register:

Priority is given to campers from Northern California. All campers from Northern California who register between Feb 1st and Feb 14th will be given equal priority if all four registration steps (see below) are completed by February 14 (and received if paying by mail); i.e. there is no advantage to registering on February 1st rather than February 14th. After February 14th, available space will be allocated on a first-come, first-serve basis after all four registration steps are completed (and received if paying by mail).  At all times, space availability will depend, in part, on the camper’s age & gender since cabins are segregated by sex and age. For more information about how to sign up for this camp, visit the registration page at CeliacCamp.com.

CHILDREN’S CELIAC CAMP – New!

In Southern California’s San Bernardino Mountains near Big Bear, campers will enjoy “a week with their peers, filled with fun activities and adventure in an environment dedicated to their dietary needs. Attend Camp Nawakwa in the beautiful Barton Flats area of the San Bernardino Mountains and enjoy archery, arts and crafts, canoeing, cookouts, drama, hip hop dance, nature lore, swimming and wall climbing.” Ages 7-15.

There will be one week:

July 30, 2012 to August 3, 2012

To register:

Spaces are limited…Plan ahead…Reserve now. Call the CDF office at 818.990.2354 or follow the registration steps on the Celiac Disease Foundation website.

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Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin February 2011 Meeting

Posted on January 29th, 2012 by Alison | Read 2 Comments - Add Your Own »

gigofmarin1Our next meeting of the Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin will take place on Monday, February 6th at 7:00.

What Does a “Gluten Free” Label Really Mean?

Products labeled “gluten free” fill supermarket shelves in ever increasing numbers, but the lack of standardized labeling laws means that shoppers cannot be sure of what exactly the label “gluten free” means.

At our next meeting on Monday, February 6, I will discuss the current issues surrounding labeling and then we will learn from the manufacturers themselves what it takes to produce a gluten-free product.

One of the hottest gluten free products showing up in bay area stores are gluten free potstickers from Feel Good Foods. We are delighted that Feel Good Foods will be with us to share samples of their delicious product, as well as other manufacturers such as Kind Bars, The Inspired Cookie, Attune Foods, and Mary’s Gone Crackers. Other vendors will be represented with samples.

Please come, find out more about the foods you buy and show your support for manufacturers’ efforts to meet the needs of gluten free shoppers. This meeting is sure to be informative and delicious!

Please let your gluten free friends and family know about this fun event. The meeting is free; however, we appreciate a donation of $5 or more to cover the costs of renting the meeting room, printing the handouts, etc.

Whether you have celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, or are learning more about gluten free living for yourself, family or friends, we welcome you to the GIG of Marin. New members, friends, and loved ones are always welcome.

As always, we request that you RSVP to this event by emailing us at: glutenfreemarin@yahoo.com.

The Gluten Intolerance Group of Marin will meet:

  • Monday, February 6th
  • 7:00 to 9:00pm
  • Community Room at Corte Madera Town Center (upstairs at PF Chang’s end) 770 Tamalpais Dr. Suite 201, Corte Madera, CA, 94925

We look forward to seeing you!

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Gluten-free donuts in 5 minutes

Posted on January 24th, 2012 by Alison | Read 13 Comments - Add Your Own »

The other day I had a gluten-free donut emergency. There was a birthday in my daughter’s class and the kid brought donuts to share. I am always prepared for birthdays with cupcakes in the freezer and I can make a fast brownie, but donuts? That is not in my repertoire.

But then I remembered that my mom had just given my daughters a Babycakes Donut Maker. At the time I wasn’t that excited about another appliance in the house, but now I was ecstatic!  All I had to do was come up with a batter that was gluten-free and egg-free (daughter is allergic to eggs) and I would have mini donuts in about five minutes! I decided to use a pancake and waffle mix as the base and work from there. I always have The Cravings Place All Purpose Pancake and Waffle Mix on hand because it is a mix that does not call for eggs at all and somehow the waffles always defy gravity and come out fluffy. I sort of used their recipe (on their website) for Shortcake to make the donut batter. I can’t be certain I followed it exactly, because, like I said, it was a donut emergency and I was in a hurry! You can probably use any gluten-free batter with success.

When I brought the mini-donuts to school, I peeked in the donut box that held the “regular” donuts and to my pleasant surprise, there were donuts with vanilla icing and chocolate sprinkles, just like I had made! My daughter and another allergic girl in the class that I brought donuts for were very happy, and I have to admit that I felt like Super Mom that day!

Here is (approximately) how I made the gluten-free dairy-free egg-free donuts:

Ingredients:

Directions:

Cut the butter or shortening into the dry mix, using a pastry cutter or knives until the the butter or shortening is blended in, or resembles small pebbles. Add the sugar and water and mix until fully blended. Batter should be somewhat thick.

Take a ziplock bag and cut off one corner so there is 1/2 inch hole. Spoon the batter into the bag, and following the directions on the donut maker, squeeze the batter out of the bag into the donut rounds when the donut maker is ready (hot). Fill it pretty full (even though the directions say to fill each with two tablespoons, don’t bother measuring). The bottom side of the donut will brown more than the top, but if you turn the donut over before icing, no one will see the less-cooked side.

Let the donuts cool a little bit before icing them or the icing will melt down the sides. For a quick icing, I mixed a little Pamela’s Vanilla Frosting Mix with a little water until it was the consistency I wanted, but you can also just use powdered sugar and water or milk, and add some vanilla too if you like. It’s up to you how you want to ice them — you can dunk the whole thing to get a glaze all over, or ice the tops like I did. There are also several frosting recipes in the recipe booklet that comes with the donut maker.

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